Competency Spotlight – OutMatch http://outmatch.com Hiring, Keeping, and Developing Great Employees Sat, 20 Jan 2018 02:26:45 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.1 In-Depth Problem Solving & Analysis http://outmatch.com/competency-spotlight-in-depth-problem-solving-and-analysis/ http://outmatch.com/competency-spotlight-in-depth-problem-solving-and-analysis/#comments_reply Fri, 18 Dec 2015 20:36:13 +0000 https://www.assess-systems.com/?p=7597 When an employee gets to a certain level of leadership, they’re expected to have the ability to solve problems and increase the quality of the processes they oversee. A common misconception is that if a person has enough experience and…

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When an employee gets to a certain level of leadership, they’re expected to have the ability to solve problems and increase the quality of the processes they oversee. A common misconception is that if a person has enough experience and education, they’ll automatically have this quality of leadership decision-making. This thought may hold some merit, because oftentimes the amount of expertise a person has depends on their experience. But the truth is, some people are just innately wired to be successful at In-Depth Problem Solving and Analysis.

This competency deals with high-level and impactful decision-making skills. When an employee has this responsibility, it’s important to measure whether they have the necessary traits to be successful in their role.

In-Depth Problem Solving and Analysis

This group of scales that make up the In-Depth Problem Solving and Analysis competency model are shown visually in an assessment report. Colors indicate whether or not a candidate falls in a preferred range for each scale.

Over three decades of research and experience have shown that there are four main traits, or scales, that factor into how a person performs at this competency.

  1. Reflective

    This scale measures a person’s tendency to be introspective and perceptive as opposed to a tendency to be less contemplative. When a role requires that a person solve difficult organizational problems, there needs to be a considerable thought process and evaluation of all options before a final decision is made.

    On the low side of this scale, a person is likely to spend less time in reflective thought and may not feel the need to look at things in an in-depth way to understand a situation. When people don’t feel the need to look at things in a deep way, they’re less likely to think ahead and consider long-term consequences. They may even miss aspects of the problem if they’re only probing surface-level issues.

    Conversely, on the high end of Reflective, people are likely to see business issues from multiple perspectives and take into account past trends and understand the implications their decision has on the future of the organization. These leaders are more likely than others to anticipate long-term consequences and understand how seemingly separate issues interrelate and tie into a single decision.

  2. Realistic

    For a person to solve difficult problems with good solutions, the solutions need to be realistic. Not all ideal solutions are attainable, so keeping in mind restraints like time, budget, and ease of implementation helps to keep possible solutions in check with what’s actually feasible.The left end of this scale represents people who tend to be wishful thinkers. These people are great at coming up with new and innovative ways to improve aspects at work, but because they tend to think in idealistic terms, some of the decisions they make might not be the most realistic, and may even be far-reaching.

    Employees who think in practical terms fall on the high end of this scale. They are more likely to arrive at decisions through a common-sense approach, keeping their ideas in check and typically basing their choices within a more realistic realm of thought. This trait keeps the decision from being overly-wishful or unattainable based on variables like company resources and importance of the decision’s outcome. But it may also result in decisions that overly rely on past solutions as opposed to understanding the unique aspects of a given problem. Consequently, moderate levels of this trait are ideal for in-depth problem solving.

  3. Fact-Based

    One of the key components to In-Depth Problem Solving and Analysis is evaluating information in an objective way. When deciding on a solution to a problem, it’s extremely important to weigh options using a pragmatic and fact-based frame of reference rather than a personal one.

    Making decisions based on an objective point of view can be difficult for people who fall on the low end of this scale. When a person is more likely to use feelings and intuition as they analyze problems to solve, they may discount important facts that have an effect on a potential solution. Taking personal values and feelings into account when making decisions isn’t a bad thing, but it may cause someone to ignore data and find a solution based on their gut feeling.

    The further a person lands to the right of this scale, the more likely they are to draw conclusions based on facts and data without allowing personal beliefs to affect their thought processes at work. People who are highly fact-based are generally more objective and when they need to solve business problems, they do so by using data and research to guide their decision. This trait makes them more suitable for roles that require In-Depth Problem Solving and Analysis. Nevertheless, individuals who are on the extreme high end of this scale may be so data-focused that they have trouble seeing nuances and the context to a given problem or situation.

  4. Serious-Minded/ Restrained

    Finding a solution to a problem takes time. It involves research, deliberation, and in-depth analysis of how each possible outcome might affect the company short-term and long-term. The best choice may not be made if a person is prone to making quick decisions without taking the necessary amount of time to really understand the implications. Conversely, if a person is too hesitant to make a clear decision, their problem may take much longer to solve than what’s needed.

    The ability to make quick decisions is important, but, depending on the role, this trait may have negative effects at work. The low end of this scale represents people who are quick to come to conclusions without needing the time to deliberate. These leaders are more likely to make impulsive decisions or dismiss others’ ideas too quickly, limiting coworker input and in-depth understanding, even if it may be vital to the decision.

    The high end of this scale also has downsides. Although people on this side of the scale are seen as responsible and careful, when it comes to making decisions, these can be hindrances. If a leader here needs to make a quick choice, they may be uncomfortable doing so because they tend to be more risk-averse and cautious. Over-deliberation, another common trait among high scorers for this scale, slows down or may even halt an employee’s decision-making process.

    The best place to land in Serious-Minded/Restrained for this particular competency is in the middle range. In this position, an employee is expected to know which decisions can be handled personally and which should require deliberation with coworkers. These leaders tend to avoid acting on a choice prematurely, which can cause an inefficient outcome, or prolonging the choice, making the decision-making process inefficient.

Problems and inefficiencies are present in every organization—there are always things that could be improved. Those problems won’t go away until a solution is found and implemented. So, knowing if the person you hire has the right skills to get things moving and improve your business is incredibly important. Using selection assessments to predict these traits in employees before a hiring decision is made is a lot like having appropriate In-Depth Problem Solving and Analysis traits, you’re using a systematic evaluation of data to make the best possible choice.

To learn more about using competency models to predict success, download our Competency Spotlight eBooks for Corporate Managers, Retail Managers, or Restaurant Managers.

The Competency Spotlight series focuses on the personality traits measured by OutMatch assessments, and how these traits impact performance. No one measure can say with 100% accuracy how an employee will behave, but considering these competencies can help you identify candidates that are ‘prewired’ to be successful in a particular job type.

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Safety Focus http://outmatch.com/competency-spotlight-safety/ http://outmatch.com/competency-spotlight-safety/#comments_reply Mon, 07 Dec 2015 20:36:07 +0000 https://www.assess-systems.com/?p=7601 Safety is important in many industries, like restaurants, factories, healthcare, and transportation (to name just a few). Because there are people that may not take the safest approach at work, which could result in injury, measuring this competency is extremely…

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Safety is important in many industries, like restaurants, factories, healthcare, and transportation (to name just a few). Because there are people that may not take the safest approach at work, which could result in injury, measuring this competency is extremely important. To evaluate this competency in the most predictive way, we measure traits associated with behaviors that affect safety.

Understanding operations and equipment, knowing related hazards and risks, as well as encouraging others to do the same, are all behaviors that people who are the best at safety practice.

This group of scales that make up the Safety competency model are shown visually in an assessment report. Colors indicate whether or not a candidate falls in a preferred range for each scale.

This group of scales that make up the Safety competency model are shown visually in an assessment report. Colors indicate whether or not a candidate falls in a preferred range for each scale.

Over three decades of research and experience have shown us that three main traits can be measured to determine how likely a person is to practice safe work habits on the job. By knowing where a person falls on each of these scales, hiring people who are the best for a role that requires safety becomes incredibly easier and more predictive.

  1. Serious-Minded/ Restrained

    This scale measures a person’s tendency to be serious, careful and cautious as opposed to making decisions quickly in a situation. When it comes to safety, being careful and thinking about things before acting is extremely important.

    The low side of Serious-Minded/Restrained is where people usually fall when they come to conclusions too quickly. These people may be comfortable responding to situations on short notice and take extra risk when making decisions. Of course, having very low restraint has its downsides. When employees score extremely low, they may tend to make decisions they’ll later regret, be impulsive, and draw conclusions without considering the outcomes. As a result, scoring low on Serious-Minded, Restrained has been associated with poor safety behaviors.

    The high end of this scale is where people fall when they tend to be more serious and calculating in their decision making process. These people may be more responsible and deliberate in their actions, and are unlikely to take unnecessary risks at work. Taken to the extreme, these employees may be overly cautious and risk adverse. In some cases this behavior is unideal, but when roles require safety and precaution, the more restraint, the better.

  2. Need for Freedom

    This scale deals with the extent of personal freedom and independence a person seeks at work. The more comfortable a person is at functioning in a structured work environment, the more likely they are to follow precautions and safety procedures.

    When people score on the low end of this scale, it means they generally show little need for personal freedom and are more comfortable working in a structured environment. They may accept direction and regulations without feeling imposed upon, and are less likely to feel constrained by organizational bureaucracies. People who fall on this side of the scale have an easier time staying productive without feeling constrained in an environment where safety and structure are key aspects of a job. Consequently, these people tend to be the best at following organizational safety procedures.

    The higher end of this scale is where people fall if they prefer a more independent working style and have a higher need for organizational freedom. These people may look for alternative ways to work if they feel that the set rules aren’t efficient enough, and are unlikely to follow rules that don’t make sense to them and their idea of personal freedom.

    To the extreme, people who score high on this scale may resist direction and require more effort to manage, as well as have more difficulty adapting to a regulated and structured business setting. These behaviors are not ideal for roles that require employees to follow safety guidelines, especially if there is the risk of injury or harm on the job.

  3. Detail Orientation

    This scale helps decipher whether a person is attentive to details or not. When people have accuracy and pay attention to the things they do, they’re not likely to make careless mistakes, which could end up causing injury or generally unsafe work environments.

    If a person falls on the low end of this scale, it could mean they dislike tasks requiring detail orientation. People here are unlikely to spend time focusing on details, and may be better at big picture thinking. In some cases they may overlook important information and become impatient when given the responsibility of a project that requires attention to detail. This could cause them to have to re-work a project which wastes time, or make risky or unsafe mistakes.

    When people pay attention to what they’re working on, the likelihood of making an unsafe error is extremely low. When people fall on the high end of this scale, they are likely to enjoy and perform well doing detailed work. Here, people are less likely to make careless mistakes, and expect a high quality of work from themselves and others. Instead of rushing to complete a task, they take enough time to ensure that their work is done correctly.

Because these three scales help predict whether or not a person exhibits safe practices at work, assessing candidates for them before you decide to hire is important. This helps you learn more about a person and how their behaviors could affect the way they perform. When it comes to employee safety, the difference between assessing and not assessing could potentially save someone from injury as well as help with an organization’s bottom line.

To learn more about using competency models to predict success, download our Competency Spotlight eBook for Corporate Managers, Retail Managers, or Restaurant Managers.

The Competency Spotlight series focuses on the personality traits measured by OutMatch job-fit assessments, and how these traits impact performance. No one measure can say with 100% accuracy how an employee will behave, but considering these competencies can help you identify candidates that are ‘prewired’ to be more successful than others in a particular job type.

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Revenue Focus http://outmatch.com/competency-spotlight-revenue-focus/ http://outmatch.com/competency-spotlight-revenue-focus/#comments_reply Mon, 16 Nov 2015 21:21:48 +0000 https://www.assess-systems.com/?p=7484 All companies need to bring in sales if they wish to continue on and grow. People in charge of bringing in new business and maximizing revenue are important assets to any organization. When they don’t perform well, these employees can…

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All companies need to bring in sales if they wish to continue on and grow. People in charge of bringing in new business and maximizing revenue are important assets to any organization. When they don’t perform well, these employees can slow down the sales process and limit the potential for the company as a whole.

Revenue Focus is a competency that deals with a person’s ability to persuade others to buy a product or service. Employees who are the best at this are assertive, but also socially smooth. They are are able to convince people by knowing how to position the product, understanding their audience, and changing their methods of persuasion to match specific potential buyers.

This group of scales that make up the Revenue Focus competency model are shown visually in an assessment report. Colors indicate whether or not a candidate falls in a preferred range for each scale.

This group of scales that make up the Revenue Focus competency model are shown visually in an assessment report. Colors indicate whether or not a candidate falls in a preferred range for each scale.

Over thirty years of research and experience indicate that these three scales are the most important to measure when identifying whether or not a person is likely to shine in a sales role:

  1. Assertiveness

    This scale measures a person’s tendency to make their presence felt as opposed to a preference for remaining in the background in a given situation. To be good at selling a product or service, a person needs the ability to assert themselves and to show confidence in what they are selling.

    When a person falls on the low end of Assertiveness, it means they are typically quiet around people and tend to be more of a listener than a talker. These employees may be uncomfortable standing their ground and as a result, let others dominate a conversation. They may lack the confidence to lead or influence others, which is less than ideal for a person who is responsible for selling a product or service to a potential client.

    The more assertive a person is, the easier it becomes to sell. People who fall on the high end of this scale demonstrate the desire to take charge and persuade others to buy from them. They’re confident in positions that require visibility and are comfortable when speaking with people in a convincing or persuasive manner. As long as they aren’t too aggressive with a person, people in charge of persuading others to buy are better off being assertive than not.

  2. Sociability

    When people have an easy time talking with others, they’re likely to have a much better chance of closing a deal. Sociability measures the extent to which a person is comfortable in social situations.

    People who score in the lower end of Sociability tend to be shy and may prefer to be alone. They’re not likely to enjoy group functions or seek out conversations with others, and may even avoid long bouts of contact with people. Employees who land here typically prefer working alone and may have difficulty getting to know others. With a tendency to be less comfortable around new acquaintances, people with low sociability may struggle with the relationship-building aspects of a sales role.

    Conversely, people who fall on the higher end of Sociability are likely to engage in conversation and enjoy meeting new people. They often find it easier to talk with people and display good social skills, making whoever they’re talking with feel comfortable and at ease. For a person who is responsible for persuading a potential client on buying a product or service, having high sociability is a strong asset to have.

  3. Work Pace

    Work Pace deals with how quickly a person prefers to work and the energy they prefer to expend on projects and tasks. With a sales focus in mind, a person with higher preferred energy levels will work quicker to obtain their goal numbers and achieve a high work output much easier than a person with a low work pace.

    The low end of this scale represents people who prefer an unhurried and slower style at work. These people are likely to be steady and persistent performers and are generally more comfortable working on slower-paced tasks. Employees who score on the low end may have difficulty meeting deadlines and maintaining a fast work pace.

    Roles that have a sales focus usually require a goal number to hit within a certain amount of time. If a person has an unhurried approach to work and dislikes a fast-pace working style, focusing on sales and meeting numbers may be more difficult.

    The high end of this scale is where people fall when they naturally favor dynamic schedules and fast-paced work environments. These employees may show lots of energy and often produce high levels of work in a shorter amount of time. When it comes to revenue focus and persuading others to buy a product or service, these attributes are an asset. People with higher scores on work pace are likely to meet sales goals with less difficulty than those who prefer tasks in which they can take their time.

Since these three scales help decipher whether or not a person will perform well when persuading potential clients to buy a product or service, knowing where a candidate lands within them is important. Knowing if a person has the right amounts of Assertiveness, Sociability, and Work Pace alleviates stresses on hiring managers by helping to identify candidates with the innate potential to succeed at this competency. This, in turn, could reduce turnover that comes with making less-than-ideal hiring decisions.

To learn more about using competency models to predict success, download our Competency Spotlight eBooks for Corporate Managers, Retail Managers, or Restaurant Managers.

The Competency Spotlight series focuses on the personality traits measured by OutMatch assessments, and how these traits impact performance. No one measure can say with 100% accuracy how an employee will behave, but considering these competencies can help you identify candidates that are ‘prewired’ to be successful in a particular job type.

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Interpersonal Communication http://outmatch.com/competency-spotlight-interpersonal-communication/ http://outmatch.com/competency-spotlight-interpersonal-communication/#comments_reply Thu, 12 Nov 2015 19:57:51 +0000 https://www.assess-systems.com/?p=7435 Every company needs employees who communicate effectively. This keeps everyone on the same page at work and provides a sense of professionalism and understanding among coworkers and clients. People who have the best communication skills are assets because they keep…

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Every company needs employees who communicate effectively. This keeps everyone on the same page at work and provides a sense of professionalism and understanding among coworkers and clients. People who have the best communication skills are assets because they keep everyone involved in a situation in the loop and share information that improves overall work progress.

Interpersonal Communication is a competency that gives insight into how effective a person is at listening to and developing rapport with others. People who are stars at communicating clearly articulate their thoughts and ensure that they are understood. They are straightforward and constructive at work, and have a sense of professionalism.

This group of scales that make up the Interpersonal Communication competency model are shown visually in an assessment report. Colors indicate whether or not a candidate falls in a preferred range for each scale.

Research and experience show that measuring how likely a person will be at communicating successfully with people inside and outside of their organization relies primarily on these three scales:

  1. Sociability

    Communicating effectively requires a certain level of sociability. Employees who feel comfortable around coworkers as well as people outside of the company have a much easier time conveying their thoughts than those who prefer to keep to themselves.People who fall on the low end of this scale often prefer to work alone and may be seen as shy. They may prefer to work independently and are unlikely to waste valuable time socializing. But, when it comes to interpersonal communication, this can be a limiter. These employees may have a more difficult time staying engaged with their team and may avoid long amounts of people contact. They might feel uneasy in group settings or when presenting in front of a larger crowd, which could make it difficult for others to get to know them and build rapport.

    On the high end, a person is more likely to seek out conversations and display robust social skills. These people find it easy to work in group settings, and building relationships with new people comes more naturally. Employees who show these characteristics are more likely to connect with others, build relationships, and communicate effectively.

  2. Assertiveness

    Assertiveness is a scale that measure a person’s tendency to take initiative and have their presence felt versus a preference to remain in the background of a situation. Interpersonal Communication requires a balance between these two behaviors for optimal results.When a candidate or employee falls on the low end of Assertiveness, it means they prefer to not be in the spotlight of a situation. They may be quiet or reticent when they communicate with others and may be uncomfortable speaking their mind or standing their ground. If they are extremely low on Assertiveness, they may lack the personal power to lead and direct others.

    On the opposite side, the high end of Assertiveness, people are more likely to be forceful in their dealings with people. They are comfortable in positions that require visibility and power, and show the desire to take charge of a situation. To the extreme, these employees might be too aggressive and are more likely to do all of the talking, rather than listening to what others have to say.

    The best communicators are found in the middle of this scale. Here, they’re likely to be assertive enough to stand their ground and take initiative in a situation. They listen carefully and follow up with questions to ensure that their ideas are fully understood by others. People who score here aren’t so forceful and aggressive that they have a hard time building a positive rapport with coworkers, and are more likely to share information that improves progress at work.

  3. Self-Control

    This scale measures a person’s tendency to be have a deliberate and serious appearance as opposed to a more carefree and unrestrained style. In order to communicate professionally and build rapport in a company and to clients, a person needs to be able to find a balance between these two behaviors.

    People who tend to be spontaneous and vocalize their feelings (even when, at times, it may not be appropriate) fall on the left side of this scale. These employees are enthusiastic and expressive, and are generally open about their thoughts. They may be seen as impulsive or even immature at times, and might speak their mind too readily or say things they’ll regret later on.

    On the far right, people show a more consistent and controlled behavior. They may be more reserved and difficult to get to know, in that they don’t reveal much of their emotion. They are seen as mature and responsible, and have a better ability to remain quiet when it’s appropriate to do so. The downsides of having too much self-control may include a person refraining from taking action or expressing themselves, as well as being seen as stiff and unfriendly.

    When communicating with others is an important aspect at work, it’s important to find a balance between these two opposite poles on the scale. When a person says whatever comes to their mind, even if it’s inappropriate, they could easily lose rapport and be seen as unprofessional. On the other hand, when a person is too buttoned-up, they might not want to communicate as often, and when they do involve themselves in conversation, they may be hard to read and relate to.

Since these three scales give clues about the effectiveness of a person’s communications style, it’s important to measure these behaviors in candidates before they’re hired. This practice gives you a much clearer understanding of how a person performs at work and helps keep turnover rates down by knowing, before the hiring decision is made, whether or not they will be right for their role within your organization.

To learn more about using competency models to predict success, download our Competency Spotlight eBooks for Corporate Managers, Retail Managers, or Restaurant Managers.

The Competency Spotlight series focuses on the personality traits measured by OutMatch assessments, and how these traits impact performance. No one measure can say with 100% accuracy how an employee will behave, but considering these competencies can help you identify candidates that are ‘prewired’ to be successful in a particular job type.

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Policies, Processes & Procedures http://outmatch.com/policies-processes-and-procedures/ http://outmatch.com/policies-processes-and-procedures/#comments_reply Thu, 05 Nov 2015 17:25:53 +0000 https://www.assess-systems.com/?p=7317 One of the basic requirements for many jobs is that an employee follow organizational policies. When a person is hired, they’re expected to adhere to certain processes and procedures, and when they don’t, oftentimes they end up underperforming or having…

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One of the basic requirements for many jobs is that an employee follow organizational policies. When a person is hired, they’re expected to adhere to certain processes and procedures, and when they don’t, oftentimes they end up underperforming or having to repeat a task until it is done correctly. This wastes time, and at the extreme, if the employee violates organizational policies, may lead to them being let go, increasing turnover and racking up hiring expenses.

Policies, Processes, and Procedures is a competency that measures a person’s tendency to follow organizational plans and guidelines so that objectives can be accomplished the right way. These people encourage others to follow rules and set a good example by consistently adhering to appropriate work guidelines.

This group of scales that make up the Policies, Processes, and Procedures competency model are shown visually in an assessment report. Colors indicate whether or not a candidate falls in a preferred range for each scale.

This group of scales that make up the Policies, Processes, and Procedures competency model are shown visually in an assessment report. Colors indicate whether or not a candidate falls in a preferred range for each scale.

Our experience and research have shown that these three scales uncover which personality characteristics naturally help employees follow set policies, processes, and procedures, and which potentially hinder a person’s ability to work in a systematic way and follow company guidelines.

  1. Need For Freedom

    The amount of freedom an employee prefers affects how imposed-upon they feel when they are asked to follow set processes and procedures.People who show a small need for freedom fall on the lower end of this scale. In this range, employees seek out work environments that are more structured. They easily adapt to a company’s rules and regulations without feeling constrained to schedules and direction from their team and boss. When a person prefers rules and guidelines they are more likely to become frustrated by ambiguity in projects, so roles where set processes drive success are more enjoyable for them.

    The more independence a person prefers, the higher they score on Need for Freedom. These employees place emphasis on organizational freedom and are less likely to follow rules that don’t coincide with their personal values of independence. Usually people with a high need for freedom are most comfortable working in roles that are loosely defined and don’t require strict adherence to standard processes.

    Negative traits of landing on the extreme high end of this scale may include resisting direction and having difficulty adapting to very structured and traditional organizations. Managing employees that score extremely high on Need for Freedom might require more effort and diplomacy than those who have a lower need for independence.

  2. Detail Orientation

    The ability to adhere to set processes and procedures requires a certain amount of detail orientation. This scale measures how much attention to detail and accuracy an employee displays at work.People who tend to dislike involvement in tasks that require attention to detail score on the low end of this scale. When someone lands here, they’re likely to focus on the big picture or the overall outcome rather than spend time on the tedious aspects of a project. In some roles, this could lead to overlooking important details or failing to follow guidelines exactly as prescribed.

    When people enjoy more meticulous work, they’re likely to land on the high end of Detail Orientation. Employees with this attribute are unlikely to make careless mistakes. They will expect high quality and accurate work from others, and take the extra time to double-check a process to ensure everything was done correctly and that the appropriate actions and procedures occurred. At work, these people often set very high standards for themselves and others, and are likely to be viewed as perfectionists.

  3. Work Organization

    People who tend to be more organized at work are often naturally better at following policies and processes, since they are innately stronger at planning out their objectives and tend to enjoy structure in work environments.The low end of this scale represents people who spend little or no time organizing tasks and objectives. These employees are unlikely to work on projects in a systematic way and may perform in a way that doesn’t follow specific instruction or procedure. Although these people are seen as more flexible than others, this could lead to completing projects in an incorrect way, especially if specific steps need to be taken in the process.

    When a person scores on the high end, it’s likely they prefer an orderly approach to work. This means they follow a specific procedure to ensure their outcome is accurate and acceptable. These employees are likely to be more consistent in their work output, following systematic processes so that tasks can be repeatable and not deviate from set policies that are expected to be followed.

These three scales help predict how a person performs at Policies, Processes, and Procedures and give insight in what to expect when they land in a particular range. If people need to be hired for positions that rely on following specific rules and guidelines, it’s important to know the likelihood of them adhering to standards before deciding to hire. Knowing how a person is likely to behave reduces turnover and increases efficiency in the hiring process.

To learn more about using competency models to predict success, download our Competency Spotlight eBooks for Corporate Managers, Retail Managers, or Restaurant Managers.

The Competency Spotlight series focuses on the personality traits measured by OutMatch assessments, and how these traits impact performance. No one measure can say with 100% accuracy how an employee will behave, but considering these competencies can help you identify candidates that are ‘prewired’ to be successful in a particular job type.

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Planning & Organizing http://outmatch.com/competency-spotlight-planning-organizing/ http://outmatch.com/competency-spotlight-planning-organizing/#comments_reply Tue, 03 Nov 2015 20:43:08 +0000 https://www.assess-systems.com/?p=7313 At work, employees have multiple responsibilities and projects, all which have due dates and different levels of priority. The ability to look at these tasks and decide what needs to happen so that everything is completed in a timely and…

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At work, employees have multiple responsibilities and projects, all which have due dates and different levels of priority. The ability to look at these tasks and decide what needs to happen so that everything is completed in a timely and manageable way is imperative.

Planning and Organizing is a competency that keeps employees from becoming overwhelmed, missing deadlines, and performing tasks that may result in an unreachable goal.

Competency scales

The group of scales that make up a competency are shown visually in an assessment as a competency model. Colors indicate whether or not a candidate falls in a preferred range for each scale.

Our Assess personality survey measures innate characteristics that affect how an employee plans out and organizes their workload so that they can achieve maximum output and be as effective as possible. Over thirty years of experience and research have shown that there are four main attributes that play into a person’s ability for Planning and Organizing.

  1. Structured

    Roles at work require more than one responsibility, and with those responsibilities come competing deadlines. Using a logical and systematic approach in planning which tasks to complete first and which are lower in priority helps employees stay efficient and focused in their day-to-day work.

    People who score on the low end of this scale tend to perform tasks in a freeform manner. They don’t let themselves worry about obstacles until they arise and are usually effective at reaching conclusions in a quick and direct way. But, these people may not feel the need to take a step-by-step approach when solving problems or considering deadlines, which could cause inefficient approaches to planning out tasks that need to be completed.

    The high end of this scale encompasses people who take a step-by-step approach to completing projects. These people enjoy doing things in a structured way and typically plan things in advance to gauge how to manage their time and prioritize objectives. Employees who land in the high range for Structured usually have well organized thought processes and achieve goals in a systematic way.

  2. Realistic

    Taking a practical approach when planning and organizing helps to prevent objectives from becoming unrealistic and unattainable. Are employees in your organization falling short when they set out on a big project? It could be because their goal was too idealistic.

    When people score on the left side of Realistic, it means they tend to think in wishful and imaginative terms. These people are seen as dreamers who are great at generating ideas and possibilities. Unfortunately, ideas and possibilities aren’t always reachable and are often idealistic, making them much more difficult to produce.

    The further someone lands to the right of this scale, the more likely they are to approach planning in a practical way. This means that they tend to be more outcome-oriented rather than possibilities-oriented. Employees who are highly realistic focus attention on immediate objectives and use common sense to solve problems and achieve goals.

  3. Work Organization

    This scale deals with a person’s tendency to schedule, plan, and arrange tasks in a way that makes sense. When employees have high work organization, they’re more likely to be effective at this competency.

    On the low end of this scale, people are unlikely to spend time planning and organizing their objectives and are seen as flexible. These employees do not spend a lot of time or energy staying organized and may not be able to keep tabs on their full workload. They may have a habit of starting projects without a fully baked idea of the process they should follow to be successful.

    Employees who prefer a more orderly approach to work fall on the high end of Work Organization. Here, people tend to plan out a project before starting it, helping to gauge how long the project takes and what all needs to be done to achieve the right outcome. A common behavior for these employees is scheduling work ahead of time so that they know exactly what to work on and ensure deadlines are met.

  4. Multi-Tasking

    This scale helps give insight into whether or not a person is comfortable handling multiple projects at once as opposed to focusing on one thing at a time. If you notice employees in your company feeling stressed or flustered when working on different tasks at once, they may be uncomfortable doing so and in turn, become less effective.

    The low end of Multi-Tasking represents people who prefer to work on one thing at a time and are effective at tasks that may be repetitive and routine in nature. These people gravitate toward stable and predictable work settings because that’s where they’ll be the most comfortable. For roles that require an employee to work on multiple things at once, these people may become frustrated if there are too many distractions, and are likely to be less flexible when changes in a plan occur.

    The opposite end of this scale is where people fall if they enjoy working on a variety of tasks at once. These employees thrive in environments where they handle multiple demands at once, and are less likely to become overwhelmed when their plate is full. People who like this type of working style tend to plan out and organize their schedule so that all of their tasks can be completed on time and with the least amount of stress to them.

    To the extreme, these employees may become easily disinterested in projects if they are repetitive and mundane. They may not always follow through on routine tasks to completion, since they don’t prefer doing the same things over and over again.

Because these four scales give insight into how a person plans out objectives and organizes their day-to-day work structure, it helps to know what to expect from a candidate or employee when they score in a particular range. These competencies help give more consistency and structure to the hiring process, and when employees are being developed, these competencies show you where strengths and weakness lie, making the process more effective.

To learn more about using competency models to predict success, download our Competency Spotlight eBooks for Corporate Managers, Retail Managers, or Restaurant Managers.

The Competency Spotlight series focuses on the personality traits measured by OutMatch assessments, and how these traits impact performance. No one measure can say with 100% accuracy how an employee will behave, but considering these competencies can help you identify candidates that are ‘prewired’ to be successful in a particular job type.

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Decisive Judgment http://outmatch.com/competency-spotlight-decisive-judgment/ http://outmatch.com/competency-spotlight-decisive-judgment/#comments_reply Tue, 27 Oct 2015 19:38:33 +0000 https://www.assess-systems.com/?p=7202 For some people, making decisions at work comes naturally. They know which facts to take into account, who to communicate their ideas to, and have the confidence to follow through on their choices. Many roles across all industries require this…

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For some people, making decisions at work comes naturally. They know which facts to take into account, who to communicate their ideas to, and have the confidence to follow through on their choices. Many roles across all industries require this ability. If employees in these roles don’t follow the proper approach leading up to their final decision, many things can go wrong in both the process and the outcome, causing ineffective or even detrimental results.

Decisive Judgment is a competency that helps decipher which people have the natural ability to make thoughtful decisions in a timely and confident way. As employees, these people carefully consider alternatives and consequences when making choices, and assume responsibility for their actions.

The group of scales that make up a competency are shown visually in an assessment as a competency model. Colors indicate whether or not a candidate falls in a preferred range for each scale.

The group of scales that make up a competency are shown visually in an assessment as a competency model. Colors indicate whether or not a candidate falls in a preferred range for each scale.

Assess personality surveys measure innate characteristics that affect how successful an employee is at making timely and positive decisions that help their company maintain effectiveness and improve processes. Over thirty years of research and knowledge gained working with our clients has led us to consider these five scales, or traits, that tie into a person’s ability to exhibit Decisive Judgment.

  1. Fact-based

    When an employee lands on the low end of this scale, it means they tend to view situations with an intuitive and personal perspective. When it comes to making decisions, these people are more likely to de-emphasize the facts, and rely more on their personal opinion in a situation.

    Let’s say a new employee is in charge of creating the weekly schedule as part of her new role in a restaurant. Instead of referring to past weeks’ schedules to gauge how many employees should be at work on different days, she goes by what she thinks a good number might be. Her decision making approach may rely more on intuition or “gut feel”, rather than focusing on available data (historical staffing trends). This might lead to over- or under-staffing—a problem that could have been avoided if she looked at the facts.

    On the high end of this scale, employees tend to make decisions objectively and based on facts. They avoid letting their personal beliefs or feelings skew the choice they make. These employees are great at evaluating the data and tangible information before taking action.

    Most decisions that are made in day-to-day tasks involve people as well as data, so too high of a score on this scale may mean the employee will rely solely on facts, without taking into account the people who are involved and how the decision affects them. You’ll want to look for a nice balance in an employee so that they are more likely to consider both people and information.

  2. Realistic

    Imaginative thinkers are extremely good at thinking creatively and can be an asset at work, but when it comes to decision-making, at what point does this trait hinder their ability to make sound choice?

    The left end of this scale represents people who tend to be wishful thinkers. These people are great at coming up with new and innovative ways to improve aspects at work, but because they tend to think in idealistic terms, some of the decisions they make might not be the most realistic, and may even be far-reaching.

    Employees who think in practical terms fall on the high end of this scale. They are more likely to arrive at decisions through a common-sense approach, keeping their ideas in check and typically not basing their choices on an idealistic view. This trait keeps the decision from being overly-wishful or unattainable based on variables like company resources and importance of the decision’s outcome.

  3. Serious-Minded/Restrained

    Do you find your employees making snap decisions without fully considering the consequences, or are they slow in making choices and committing to solutions? If so, they may fall outside of the preferred range for this competency.

    The ability to make quick decisions is important, but on the low end of this scale, this trait may have negative effects at work. Employees who score low on Serious-Minded/Restrained are more likely to make decisions without deliberating with others, leaving those who will be affected by the change in the dark and missing key factors that play into which decision is the best choice. These people may also make impulsive decisions or dismiss others’ ideas too quickly, limiting coworker input even if it may be vital to the decision.

    The high end of this scale also has downsides. Being too restrained might cause employees to take things too seriously, or have a lower likelihood to commit on issues because they delay making a decision. Although employees on this side of the scale are seen as responsible and careful, when it comes to making decisions, these can be hindrances. If an employee here needs to make a quick choice, they may be uncomfortable doing so because they tend to be more risk-averse and cautious. Over-deliberation, another common trait among high scorers for this scale, slows down or may even halt an employee’s decision-making process.

    The best place to land in Serious-Minded/Restrained for this particular competency is in the middle range. In this position, an employee is expected to know which decisions can be handled personally and which should require deliberation with coworkers. These people tend to avoid acting on a choice prematurely, which can cause an inefficient outcome, or prolonging the choice, making the decision-making process inefficient.

  4. Self-Reliance

    This scale measure a person’s preference for relying on themselves and taking initiative as opposed to working in a team setting and looking to others for input and support. Do you notice employees at your company with the ability to make decisions on their own, or are they waiting for others to make decisions for them?

    Employees who often rely on others’ opinions and feedback prior to making decisions fall on the low end of this scale (the keyword here is rely). Traits to watch out for in employees who fall here include over-delegating tasks and responsibilities as well as requiring extra support and direction when making decisions. Often, these people are seen as collaborative consensus builders, but at their worst, they may be seen as unsure of themselves and unwilling to actually make decisions. Clearly, this can be a big issue for a role that requires this competency.

    On the opposite end of the scale you find people who are independent and highly self-reliant. These employees mainly rely on themselves and are expected to take the initiative in any goal they set out to accomplish. This level of independence might cause employees to show reluctance in delegating tasks and an unwillingness to accept assistance even when it’s appropriate to do so. On top of that, people who land in the high range are often less likely to seek advice and discuss plans with their team.

    The best place for an employee who has the responsibility of making decisions is in the middle range for this scale. Here, they should demonstrate the ability to lead their decision-making process and communicate with the right people in a timely manner for support. They are more likely to welcome input from others without the tendency to completely rely on coworkers to make the decision for them.

  5. Assertiveness

    Employees who have the responsibility for making decisions need to be assertive in their choices. This means taking the initiative and having confidence in their convictions, rather than being reticent and uncomfortable standing their ground.

    When people fall on the low end of Assertiveness, they’re more likely be soft-spoken and act unsure of themselves and their decisions. They’re seen as easy to work with and are good listeners, but may be uncomfortable speaking their minds. This can lead to indecisiveness or lack of clarity in the decision-making process—a problem when their role calls for taking charge and making important choices.

    People scoring at the high end of Assertiveness often demonstrate the desire and confidence to take charge at work. A certain amount of responsibility comes with making decisions, because every decision has effects that have the potential to hurt or help the company. High scorers on this scale tend to be comfortable in positions requiring leadership and taking command or making choices that affect others in the organization.

Decisive Judgment is a must-have competency for employees who need to make day-to-day or long-term decisions. Since these five scales deal with traits that factor into how well an employee makes decisions, assessing for these traits helps you choose the right employees for a role, which in turn helps your organization run smoothly and maintain effectiveness. Knowing if a person has the natural ability to perform well at their job alleviates stresses for hiring managers and, once that person is in the role, gives peace of mind since you’ll know what to expect from the individual.

To learn more about using competency models to predict success, download our Competency Spotlight eBooks for Corporate Managers, Retail Managers, or Restaurant Managers.

The Competency Spotlight series focuses on the personality traits measured by OutMatch assessments, and how these traits impact performance. No one measure can say with 100% accuracy how an employee will behave, but considering these competencies can help you identify candidates that are ‘prewired’ to be successful in a particular job type.

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Managing Others http://outmatch.com/competency-spotlight-managing-others/ http://outmatch.com/competency-spotlight-managing-others/#comments_reply Wed, 21 Oct 2015 13:57:46 +0000 https://www.assess-systems.com/?p=7057 The ability to lead others is a trait sought after in all managers– that’s what the role calls for. Companies rely on managers to motivate and direct a team so that goals can be accomplished in successful and productive ways.…

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The ability to lead others is a trait sought after in all managers– that’s what the role calls for. Companies rely on managers to motivate and direct a team so that goals can be accomplished in successful and productive ways.

Managing Others is a competency that deals with how effectively a leader directs the activities of their team. The best leaders are encouraging, honest, and objective when dealing with their team, working through them to accomplish goals while holding everyone accountable for their tasks.

This group of scales that make up the Managing Others competency model are shown visually in an assessment report. Colors indicate whether or not a candidate falls in a preferred range for each scale.

Our Assess personality survey measures innate characteristics that affect how a manager persists and encourages their team to finish tasks and achieve objectives. Over thirty years of experience and research have shown that there are seven main attributes that play into a person’s ability for Managing Others.

  1. Assertiveness

    Overseeing a team requires a certain amount of assertiveness. This scale measures the tendency of a person to take initiative and make their presence felt, versus the personal preference to blend and remain in the background of a given situation.When potential managers fall on the low end of Assertiveness, it means they tend to be less outspoken or prefer remaining in the background. These people are seen as great listeners and easy to work with, but they might feel more anxiety when they need to stand their ground and direct others. Low assertiveness in a manager can lead to less effective performance, because these people are naturally less likely to make their voices heard and influence others.

    The high end of this scale represents leaders who demonstrate the confidence it takes to direct a team and drive results. People who fall on this end are more comfortable in a position that requires visibility and power, making it naturally easier for them to delegate tasks to a team and uphold a certain amount of dominance needed to take charge of an entire team. Highly assertive managers have a much easier time influencing others and making a strong impression on their team.

  2. Positive About People

    This scale measures how much or little trust and positivity a person has toward other people. Do you notice your managers acting overly-critical with their team? If so, you may be dealing with a leader who sways toward being more negative than what is ideal.People who fall on the low end of this scale are likely to be skeptical and overly cautious in trusting others. Managers on this end may fail to recognize the achievements of their team and are seen as difficult to please, holding a “nothing is ever good enough” type of attitude. They might be a hoverer, micromanaging those on the team because they lack faith in their coworkers.

    When a person lands on the higher end of this scale, they’re likely to focus on the positive attributes of people and are generally accepting of others. Managers here are good at developing their team, as they see mistakes as opportunities to learn and grow.

    You’ve probably noticed the yellow block at the end of this scale. Leaders who fall on the extreme right of Positive About People might overlook limitations in others and may give too many second chances to team members. Be on the lookout for these traits in managers at your company (they can always be developed and improved!).

  3. Need to be Liked

    The left side of this scale represents people who don’t place being liked by others as a high priority. When a person lands here, it doesn’t mean that they have absolutely no interest in being liked by others. Instead, if this manager is in a competitive situation with their team or other coworkers, they’ll likely focus on the personal gain of winning, even if it may mean that someone else has to lose out.The high end of this scale is also important to note. For this particular competency, a high need to be liked can also have its liabilities. When managers land here, it typically means they are approachable and likable; they show concern for others and are cooperative and accommodating. However, managers here may try too hard to make others like them. You may see traits of being too agreeable or a difficulty saying no. Managers scoring on the high end may also have difficulty providing direct feedback to others or communicating ‘tough’ messages.

    The best place for an employee who is in charge of managing others is in the middle of this scale. In this range, a leader isn’t so focused on others liking them to the point to where they wouldn’t stand their ground when their team might disagree with them, but also not so low that they argue and are overly-competitive.

  4. Sociability

    Sociability is an important trait for managers to have. Because they have a team to direct, a manager must be comfortable conversing with coworkers about issues, projects, and plans. Do you notice managers at your company working in silos and failing to communicate expectations to their team?When managers land on the low end of this scale, it means they prefer to work alone or in small teams, and may be uncomfortable working in large groups. People with this trait tend to avoid long amounts of time in social situations. Scoring low for this trait doesn’t mean a person dislikes people, but simply that they’d be more comfortable in smaller groups. These managers are more likely to shy away from networking events or conferences where they would have to speak in front of a group or interact with people with whom they are unfamiliar.

    On the high end, managers tend to seek out coworkers and engage in a lot of conversations. These people display great social skills and when they are presenting or leading a meeting, they are in their element. This quality in a leader is important because managing others involves a lot of communication, whether it be one-on-one or in a group setting. They also tend to keep up with what everyone in their group is working on and talk with their team in an easy and comfortable way.

  5. Work Pace

    Managing a team can be overwhelming if a manager isn’t comfortable with a high work pace. This role calls for a person to be on top of what their team is doing, along with their own tasks. This requires a lot of work and a faster-pace schedule is part of the territory.The low side of this scale represents people who work best in an unhurried environment. These leaders are seen as steady-going. When a person has a low work place, they tend to not push others to work at a faster rate. This trait in a leader has the potential to slow down their entire team, possibly missing deadlines and pushing back projects.

    On the high end, managers usually prefer a vigorous schedule at work. These people thrive in busy environments and typically have a high energy attitude. When it comes to managing their team, this aspect in a leader is extremely beneficial. They encourage their team to accomplish tasks within the deadline and produce a high level or work output. These people should find it much easier to keep tabs on team projects and push for success.

  6. Self Reliance

    Managing others requires a combination of independent work and collaboration with a team. The ideal place for managers to fall on this scale is usually in the middle range.People fall on the low end of this scale when they rely on others’ opinions and feedback before making work decisions. This is a great style to have, because it ensures that an employee won’t jump the gun on any given decision. However, at the manager level, this could be a bit of a hindrance. Managers here may be unwilling to make their own choices, require extra support from others, and tend to over-delegate tasks.

    On the opposite side (high Self-Reliance), managers are more likely to work well without direction and take initiative. . To the extreme, managers here may be hesitant to delegate tasks, and may not seek advice from their team, even if the quality of their decision could be improved by doing so.

    The best managers have a nice balance between these two extremes. These managers are more appropriately willing to consult their team when making a decision, for example, when the decision affects the team as a whole. Managers here are likely to make smaller decisions alone, and larger decisions with others. These people are typically more aware of the amount of tasks that should be delegated to the team so that work is evenly distributed in a way that makes the most sense.

  7. Optimism

    If a manager has a negative view toward work or projects, it affects the whole team. This is problematic for the group as a whole and can negatively affect work output, work relationships, and overall attitude.Leaders who fall on the low end of optimism tend to be sensitive to difficult situations, like a team member needing to leave early or someone not completing a task on time. These people often get frustrated with problems beyond their control, and are easily affected by setbacks in plans and projects. Usually seen as over-worrying, managers with a low sense of optimism are prone let events at work impact their state of mind, which can negatively influence their team. Team members may feel uneasy when approaching their manager with a problem, not knowing how their manager will react to bad news.

    Looking for the upside of a situation is a common trait among optimistic people. This glass-half-full perspective encourages the team to persist on even if setbacks occur. Modeling this type of attitude provides a team with a consistent and positive view of their manager, which fosters productive conversation, a higher level of teamwork, and overall success in working relationships.

Since these scales give insight into how a person manages others, it’s important to understand what to expect from people when they fall in a certain range within these scales. Managing Others is a competency that reflects a person’s skills at working through a team of people to accomplish project and company goals.

Think about all of the traits represented in this blog, and consider the amount of insight in knowing where a person falls on these scales, and how this affects their work performance. Without using assessments, there’s no clear way of examining whether a person falls short of or excels past the necessary skills for a leadership role. In other words, there’s much less predictive value in your selection or development process without measuring these competencies.

To learn more about using competency models to predict success, download our Competency Spotlight eBooks for Corporate Managers, Retail Managers, or Restaurant Managers.

The Competency Spotlight series focuses on the personality traits measured by OutMatch assessments, and how these traits impact performance. No one measure can say with 100% accuracy how an employee will behave, but considering these competencies can help you identify candidates that are ‘prewired’ to be successful in a particular job type.

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Delivering Results http://outmatch.com/competency-spotlight-delivering-results/ http://outmatch.com/competency-spotlight-delivering-results/#comments_reply Mon, 10 Aug 2015 21:19:42 +0000 https://www.assess-systems.com/?p=6418 People are hired for a reason: to contribute positively to an organization so that it can continue to run smoothly. Every person in a company pulls a certain amount of weight, and is responsible for delivering results. The most effective…

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People are hired for a reason: to contribute positively to an organization so that it can continue to run smoothly. Every person in a company pulls a certain amount of weight, and is responsible for delivering results. The most effective employees have the ability to maintain a high level of commitment and reliance so that getting things done at work comes second nature.

Delivering Results is a competency model that helps shed light on an employee’s need to assume personal responsibility for achieving positive outcomes and work effectively with little direction. The extent to which a person feels the need to be self-reliant and take initiative to complete tasks could easily be the deciding factor on how long that person stays with your company.

delivering results

This group of scales that make up the Delivering Results competency model are shown visually in an assessment report. Colors indicate whether or not a candidate falls in a preferred range for each scale.

Our Assess Personality survey measures innate traits that impact how a person handles deadlines and whether or not they’re able to maintain a personal level of commitment to delivering positive results consistently. Over three decades of research and validation have shown that there are five main traits that affect a person’s ability to deliver desirable results.

  1. Work Pace

    If an employee prefers an unhurried and more relaxed work pace, they may fall behind on tasks that need to happen at a quicker rate. Do you find your employees having difficulty meeting deadlines? If so, you may be dealing with employees who prefer a slow work pace.

    People who fall on the low end of this scale often find it harder to uphold effectiveness while working at a faster pace, and may become overwhelmed if there is a time crunch on projects. If a person who prefers a slower work pace is in a position that requires quick and immediate action, it could directly affect their frustration tolerance and their ability to complete assigned duties.

    The high end of Work Pace includes employees who prefer a more vigorous work schedule. They show high amounts of stamina and produce a high level of work output. These employees tend to complete tasks by or before their deadlines, and often remain unaffected by the stresses of falling behind on the job.

  2. Self-Reliance

    Employees who consistently deliver results are often those who take initiative as opposed to waiting on others for support. The tendency to be self-reliant is an asset that shouldn’t be taken for granted, and should actively be sought after.

    If a person lands on the low end of this scale, it means that they more often than not rely on others for assistance. These employees are great at activities requiring teamwork and sharing responsibility, but may depend on this type of community work style to be effective. In the low range, employees may be unsure of themselves to the point that they may not be able to make decisions alone.

    The opposite side of this scale represents people who are seen as self-sufficient and are often the same people who take initiative. These employees won’t need as much support or assistance as those who fall on the low end. If a person has high self-reliance, it means they are confident enough in their decisions to perform independently and remain effective and successful.

  3. Need for Task Closure

    This scale measures how strong of a need a person has to finish what they start. If an employee doesn’t feel the need to finish jobs, chances are they won’t be the best at delivering results.

    A person who falls on the low end of this scale is comfortable changing focus and leaving projects incomplete. Because employees seen here place less importance on finishing what they begin, they’re likely to be more forgiving when others don’t finish tasks on time. These employees are more comfortable leaving projects open-ended in case of a priority change, but this trait may be their usual working style.

    Having the need for task closure is a critical trait to search for in employees because it directly affects their motivation to persist through projects to completion. If employees fall on the high end of this scale, they’re likely to consistently deliver finished and quality results for all tasks and projects they begin. They often have a natural need to finish what they begin, making them a more reliable choice when hiring.

  4. Realistic

    Delivering results means following through on an attainable goal so that operations can continue to improve and run smoothly. If a goal isn’t realistic, it’s probably not attainable. This scale deals with a person’s tendency to take a practical approach as opposed to a wishful or imaginative approach in situations.

    The left side of this scale’s spectrum represents people who are imaginative and innovative. These employees are seen as creative and are generally good at generating ideas and possibilities. However, this quality has the potential to hinder a person’s ability to think practically and approach projects in a sensible and immediate way.

    Employees who land on the right side of this scale are predicted to be more likely than others to take a quick and sensible approach to solving a problem or completing a project. If there is an effective and practical way to accomplish something, these people prefer to take that route. They tend to not seek out new ways of carrying out an action unless it is immediate and more efficient than how they already perform. These characteristics positively impact employees who consistently deliver results.

  5. Frustration Tolerance

    Whether it’s a major project or a daily duty, all employees are responsible for adhering to some sort of deadline. Dealing with multiple or speedy due dates can be frustrating and make some people feel overwhelmed and burned out. This scale helps in deciphering whether or not a person can maintain productivity while under pressure.

    If a candidate falls on the low end of Frustration Tolerance, it’s because they show signs of having difficulty recovering from setbacks in plans. People here are hypersensitive to changes and unexpected outcomes, making them more prone to worrying or becoming flustered than others.

    Conversely, when a person lands on the higher end of this scale, it means that they’re typically resilient and seldom worry when they have a lot on their plate at once. They’re able to keep a level head when dealing with multiple tasks and deadlines at a time, and persist so that the duties which they’re responsible for are carried out.

Since the Delivering Results competency gives predictable insight in how a person handles tasks and all of the included responsibilities and stresses, these five scales help decide whether or not that person is the right fit for your company’s position. With both time and money invested in your employees, knowing whether or not a person pulls their own weight and makes a meaningful impact in their position is the difference between hiring right and hiring with regret.

To learn more about using competency models to predict success, download our Competency Spotlight eBooks for Corporate Managers, Retail Managers, or Restaurant Managers.

The Competency Spotlight series focuses on the personality traits measured by OutMatch assessments, and how these traits impact performance. No one measure can say with 100% accuracy how an employee will behave, but considering these competencies can help you identify candidates that are ‘prewired’ to be successful in a particular job type.

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Customer Focus http://outmatch.com/competency-spotlight-customer-focus/ http://outmatch.com/competency-spotlight-customer-focus/#comments_reply Fri, 10 Jul 2015 19:03:22 +0000 https://www.assess-systems.com/?p=6068 Happy customers are necessary to keep a company in business. They have the power to buy or not buy your products, and convince others to do the same. Good food or good prices bring in customers, but a bad service…

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Happy customers are necessary to keep a company in business. They have the power to buy or not buy your products, and convince others to do the same. Good food or good prices bring in customers, but a bad service experience can keep them from coming back.

Customer Focus measures a person’s desire to please customers and anticipate their needs. People that have excellent guest focus strive to exceed the expectations of customers and encourage others to do so as well.

customer-focus-scales

The group of scales that make up a competency are shown visually in an assessment as a competency model. Colors indicate whether or not a candidate falls in a preferred range for each scale.

Our surveys measure innate traits that impact a person’s ability to provide a pleasing experience for any customer. Over three decades of research and experience have shown that there are four key traits that play into someone’s Customer Focus competency.

  1. Insight

    Showing interest in what customers want and understanding others’ motivations is an important attribute for employees in any consumer-facing company. Having insight keeps employees one step ahead, and by anticipating the needs of customers, they drive business and sales.

    When employees fall on the low end of this scale, they tend to overlook people issues when making decisions. Employees here may not be able to recognize emotional cues as well as those who have a better handle on reading people. Because of this, they may not recognize how their own behavior is impacting the customer, and might find it harder to anticipate the needs of others.

    The high end of Insight includes employees who tend to be understanding of others’ feelings. These employees are more attuned to interpersonal issues and place a higher emphasis on giving customers the best experience possible. Those who have the desire to understand people find it easier to evaluate their needs and provide the best customer service.

  2. Positive About People

    Having a positive outlook towards people makes interactions with them much easier. In industries where customer experience is a main focus, being critical and negative can be detrimental to business.

    If a person is skeptical of people and generally untrusting of others, they likely fall on the low end of this scale. Here, employees may be difficult to please and might even show intolerance towards something they don’t agree with. These people may be harder to take advantage of because they are naturally less trusting. However, these employees may find it uncomfortable to have to be positive and trusting of others, making their interactions feel more forced.

    On the high end of the spectrum, employees generally concentrate on positive attributes of people and accept others without being critical. Having a positive outlook towards people makes providing customer service come more naturally, because these employees want to help. In a situation where a customer is being catered to, it’s important that employees focus on creating a positive environment.

  3. Assertiveness

    Employees should make their presence known to help reassure customers that if they need help, they know where to find it. Showing confidence in front of strangers, especially when they have questions is one of the most important traits for customer-facing employees to have.

    When employees score low in Assertiveness, it means they’re likely more reserved and quieter than most people. Typically these employees are seen as good listeners and easy to work with. Although being reserved isn’t a bad trait to have, it may hinder communication between the employee and customer. Effectively dealing with customers requires a certain amount confidence to make the customer feel like they are in good hands.

    People who score high in Assertiveness are comfortable talking to people and typically enjoy having conversations. In this range, employees make their customers feel welcome and taken care of. They leave a lasting impression and may even be able to influence customers to buy more of a product or service.

  4. Work Pace

    Industries that cater to customers all experience the rush– the certain hours during the day where there are so many people who need to be helped. Sometimes this can be overwhelming, so why not have the peace of mind and know your employees can handle such a fast-paced environment?

    Employees who prefer a slower working environment fall on the left end of this scale. Because they are more comfortable doing things in a relaxed manner, they may become easily frustrated when it comes time to pick up the pace a bit. People who have an unhurried work style tend to be uncomfortable having to scramble to get everything done in a short amount of time. When people feel rushed, they can become flustered, which leads to aggravation, mistakes, and inefficiency. None of these things are okay with customers.

    Employees who are the most effective during busy or hectic times fall on the right side. These people may even prefer a fast-paced work environment. They are able to remain collected and effective during the rush of demanding customers. Employees who can handle a fast work pace are able to make each customer feel especially taken care of, even though they may be helping dozens at a time.

Since these four scales cover people’s outlooks towards others and the degree to which they can maintain presence and positivity during hectic times, they give clues about how well an employee focuses on customers.

It’s critical for the employees of any customer-facing industry to present themselves as welcoming and helpful, no matter the circumstances. Customers who’ve been provided great service are likely to not only come back again, but also encourage other people to become customers as well.

To learn more about using competency models to predict success, download our Competency Spotlight eBook for Corporate Managers, Retail Managers, or Restaurant Managers.

The Competency Spotlight series focuses on the personality traits measured by OutMatch job-fit assessments, and how these traits impact performance. No one measure can say with 100% accuracy how an employee will behave, but considering these competencies can help you identify candidates that are ‘prewired’ to be more successful than others in a particular job type.

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Driving for Results http://outmatch.com/competency-spotlight-driving-for-results/ http://outmatch.com/competency-spotlight-driving-for-results/#comments_reply Mon, 29 Jun 2015 15:03:43 +0000 https://www.assess-systems.com/?p=6174 Effective managers have the ability to encourage employees to perform at their best and drive for task completion in a motivating and confident way. Without positive results from accomplished goals, a company can’t move forward, and falls behind. Driving for…

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Effective managers have the ability to encourage employees to perform at their best and drive for task completion in a motivating and confident way. Without positive results from accomplished goals, a company can’t move forward, and falls behind.

Driving for Results deals with a manager’s capability to encourage their employees to perform effectively so that the company can excel. These leaders help establish realistic objectives, assume personal responsibility for the success of the organization, and persist through setbacks to achieve goals.

driving-for-results

This group of scales that make up the Driving for Results competency model are shown visually in an assessment report. Colors indicate whether or not a candidate falls in a preferred range for each scale.

Our talent assessments measure innate characteristics that affect how a manager persists and encourages their team to finish tasks and achieve objectives. Over thirty years of experience and research have shown that there are five main behaviors that play into a person’s Drive for Results.

  1. Assertiveness

    To be able to push employees and encourage them to complete their work effectively, a manager needs a certain amount of assertiveness. Do you notice your managers standing their ground when dealing with employees, or do they lack the confidence to take control of a situation?

    Managers who fall on the low end of Assertiveness are usually easy to work with and are seen as great listeners. Although these are good qualities, in a position where managing others and being results-focused is critical, these traits may not be the most effective. The downsides to having low assertiveness include lacking the confidence to lead and direct others and letting others dominate the direction of a team.

    The high end of Assertiveness includes people who demonstrate that they have the desire and confidence to lead and take charge of their employees in an impactful way. These managers are more comfortable in a position that requires visibility and authority. Because managers need to be able to take initiative with their employees, having a higher amount of assertiveness is critical.

  2. Self-Reliance

    This scale measures the extent to which a person relies on others for support. As a manager, a person needs to be able to be independent and self-reliant rather than be unable to make their own decisions. Employees rely on managers for instruction and decision-making.

    Because managers are in a leadership position, they must take initiative with their team so that goals can be accomplished on time. Leaders who fall on the low end of Self-Reliance often rely on others for support or assistance. They may be unsure of their decisions at times and might even require more hands-on direction to be effective at managing a team.

    Great leaders fall on the higher end of this scale. They have self-confidence and assume responsibility for the actions and performance of their employees. Managers with high self-reliance are independent and able to make important decisions without needing to seek advice. They are sure of themselves which relays a sense of certainty to their employees.

  3. Work Pace

    This scale gives insight into what a person’s preferred work pace is. If a manager is effective at leading a team of employees, delegating tasks, making sure the delegated tasks are completed correctly, as well as looking forward at tasks that need to be accomplished, it’s because they have the right amount of work pace.

    When a manager has low work pace, it means they prefer slower working conditions and aren’t comfortable being rushed with deadlines. Since managers are in charge of maintaining a group of employees, customers, and all other aspects of their department or location, having a low work pace may cause managers to become frustrated and overwhelmed.

    Efficient managers have a high work pace. They’re able to maintain a level head when dealing with projects that need to be accomplished quickly. Because they prefer a faster work environment, it’s unlikely that these managers will let their employees or themselves fall behind on duties.

  4. Realistic

    Being realistic helps managers arrange employee tasks in an order that makes sense. Managers who focus on important and achievable objectives first are more likely to see positive results than managers who prioritize unrealistic goals.

    Managers who fall on the low end of this scale are more imaginative and are often seen as wishful thinkers. They want to accomplish goals that may be more idealistic than realistic, causing priority tasks to be pushed to the side. Although leaders here are seen as innovative and creative, it may take a toll on progress at work.

    Leaders who prioritize goals in a way that produces results in an organization fall in the higher range for this scale. These managers are outcome-oriented, focused on results and company improvements. They strive to accomplish realistic goals in a realistic order so that they can help improve the company and keep their employees on target with a set plan.

  5. Frustration Tolerance

    Managing a group of people and having the responsibility of producing results for a company can be a lot to handle for someone with a low frustration tolerance. The ability to overcome obstacles and continue achieving goals despite setbacks is an extremely important quality for a leader to have, especially since employees look to them for direction.

    The low end of Frustration Tolerance represents people who tend to be easily discouraged and have difficulty recovering from setbacks in a plan. Managers who fall on this end probably won’t be the best at displaying confidence to employees if something goes wrong or changes. If employees see that their manager isn’t handling stress in a positive way, they may be encouraged to feel the same, causing projects to stall or never be completed.

    When people fall on the high end of this scale, it means they’re likely to be resilient even when faced with unforeseen issues and obstacles. These leaders are not easily upset and remain positive under difficult circumstances, encouraging their team to do the same and continue forward. The best managers don’t give up on plans easily and persist through problems to achieve goals.

Because these scales give clues about how a leader will perform while having the responsibility to achieve results through managing others, they help decipher whether a person will be good or not at driving for results.

For a company to move forward, it must have managers and leaders that drive for results. These managers need to be comfortable relaying their ideas to their team, taking the responsibility for the completion of a project, working in a fast-paced environment, prioritizing projects in a realistic order, and maintaining a positive attitude when obstacles arise. By assessing for these traits, you find out who is best prepared for a managerial role.

To learn more about using competency models to predict success, download our Competency Spotlight eBook for Corporate Managers, Retail Managers, or Restaurant Managers.

The Competency Spotlight series focuses on the personality traits measured by OutMatch job-fit assessments, and how these traits impact performance. No one measure can say with 100% accuracy how an employee will behave, but considering these competencies can help you identify candidates that are ‘prewired’ to be more successful than others in a particular job type.

Interested in learning more about OutMatch Assessment?

Schedule a Demo Today

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Teamwork & Collaboration http://outmatch.com/competency-spotlight-teamwork-and-collaboration/ http://outmatch.com/competency-spotlight-teamwork-and-collaboration/#comments_reply Thu, 25 Jun 2015 20:41:20 +0000 https://www.assess-systems.com/?p=6148 In most industries, teamwork is mandatory, and usually unavoidable. Because collaboration with coworkers is something that most people have to do at work, it’s better to make sure that the people you hire can be team players. Teamwork and Collaboration…

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In most industries, teamwork is mandatory, and usually unavoidable. Because collaboration with coworkers is something that most people have to do at work, it’s better to make sure that the people you hire can be team players.

Teamwork and Collaboration entails building and maintaining cooperative relationships at work with coworkers and helping to reach a group goal.

Teamwork and Collaboration scales

The group of scales that make up a competency are shown visually in an assessment as a competency model. Colors indicate whether or not a candidate falls in a preferred range for each scale.

The group of scales that make up a competency are shown visually in an assessment as a competency model. Colors indicate whether or not a candidate falls in a preferred range for each scale.

The Assess Personality Survey measures innate characteristics that impact how a person interacts and works with coworkers to achieve a common goal.

  1.  Sociability

    Working effectively with coworkers takes being comfortable around them. If a person prefers to work alone and finds being around a group of people uncomfortable, they probably don’t have a strong ability to be social.

    When a person falls on the low end of Sociability, it means they prefer to be alone while working. These employees are comfortable doing tasks on their own and tend to stay away from larger groups of people. This doesn’t mean a person on the low end of Sociability doesn’t like other people, just that they prefer to be in smaller groups or even alone when doing a job.

    The high end of this scale includes people that are completely comfortable at communicating with their coworkers so that a task can be completed. The danger of being too social is present here and some people on the extreme right of this scale may find themselves overemphasizing social interaction at the expense of getting a job done.

    The middle of this scale is the best place for employees who need to interact with each other to be. These employees are social enough that they can be productive with others to achieve a goal or finish a task, yet not so social that they’d spend valuable time conversing with coworkers and delaying work. The bottom line is that a person needs a certain amount of sociability to be communicate and cooperate with other employees at work.

  2. Positive About People

    Having a positive outlook on people and their opinions is important when working in a group. Employees who know how to work with people rather than being critical and negative towards others are the best when it comes to teamwork and collaboration.

    Employees who fall on the low end of this scale tend to be critical of their co-workers. This may make working as a team difficult since these people are often untrusting of others’ ideas. This could make others feel uncomfortable and inhibit productivity for the sake of someone’s personal preferences. To the extreme, employees may be intolerant of other people’s opinions and find it harder to recognize their coworker’s abilities and achievements.

    On the higher end, people are usually able to create a positive work environment. These employees are more likely to trust other people’s opinions and concentrate on the good aspects of coworkers. When members of a team fall on this end of the scale, they’re more likely to cooperate together productively without tearing down each other’s ideas and bringing criticism into the mix.

  3. Need to be Liked

    Most of the time, when a person feels the need to be liked, they’ll act toward others how they wish to be acted upon. Much like the “Golden Rule” to treat other’s how you wish to be treated, this scale deals with being approachable and cooperative rather than being competitive and possibly preventing working relationships with co-workers so that a person’s need to be liked is met.

    On the left side of this scale, employees are seen as being stand-offish and only concerned with themselves and their own work over the work and goals of a team. Landing on this side means a person is more likely to disagree or take an unpopular stance since they aren’t as worried about being liked by other people. However, this may involve arguing against something for the sole purpose of disagreeing or “stirring the pot.”

    On the right side of Need to be Liked fall people who are generally approachable, likeable, and cooperative. These employees make the best team members because they give what they want to receive. They easily make each other feel valued and integral to the team, creating a work environment that’s sure to be friendly, effective, and productive.

  4. Optimism

    Whether or not a person has a generally negative attitude could impact their performance at work. This scale takes into account how positive of an outlook a person has, and considers how this outlook affects the ability to work productively as a team. Are your employees hindered by pessimism within the team, or do they generally stay consistent with an optimistic state of mind?

    Goals are sometimes hard to achieve, especially with a gloomy attitude. The low end of this scale represents those who are tend to have a negative perspective about things. Often if setbacks occur, these are the people who have a hard time persevering and continuing on with a set plan. When cooperating together as a team, people who fall low on this scale may be seen as resistant, overly-concerned, and their negativity may affect other members of the group in an unfavorable way.

    Having a high sense of optimism works well when employees need to work as a team. The ability to maintain a positive perspective when working with the team to attain a goal is critical. Optimism keeps people moving forward, because they believe there is something to look forward to. Without optimism, employees may feel like there is no means to an end, or that a goal cannot be reached.

  5. Self-Reliance

    Working as a team requires relying on each other and motivating each other to do the best work they can so that everyone can work together towards attaining a goal. Are your employees often unwilling to accept help from the team or even reluctant to cooperate with coworkers? They may have too much self-reliance.

    Employees who fall on the lower end of this scale are often seen as the team player. They seek advice, help others, and discuss plans with their team before taking a big action. People like this work well in teams because they are comfortable sharing responsibility with others.

    The high end of this scale represents those who prefer to work alone. These employees usually don’t like having to seek advice or discuss plans, even if they need to. They are likely to take initiative and are willing to assume responsibility for actions, and although these are good qualities to have, these behaviors could easily inhibit a team’s ability to collaborate and achieve their goal.

Teamwork and collaboration are things that have to happen in most companies, and are often inevitable. If employees can’t work together and rely on one another to complete tasks, then there is a higher risk of things not being completed on time, or at all, and frustration amongst employees who can’t work appropriately in a group could hinder productivity.

It’s important to find out whether or not a person can handle working with others before they’re hired. Doing so helps your company avoid teamwork problems among employees. Where do you think your employees fall in this competency? Could this be improved?

To learn more about using competency models to predict success, download our Competency Spotlight eBooks for Corporate Managers, Retail Managers, or Restaurant Managers.

The Competency Spotlight series focuses on the personality traits measured by OutMatch assessments, and how these traits impact performance. No one measure can say with 100% accuracy how an employee will behave, but considering these competencies can help you identify candidates that are ‘prewired’ to be successful in a particular job type.

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