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Is It Time For The Daily Performance Review?
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This post was written by Greg Morgan, President and CEO of our newly combined company, Chequed.com and Assess Systems (cooler name coming soon). See this post and other great content from Greg on LinkedIn.

Was driving to the airport listening to an NPR report on a Financial Times article on Accenture’s decision to end the traditional annual performance review. A lot has been made of this decision that allows Accenture to join the thousands of other companies who long ago decided this practice made no sense. I guess it just took a big brand who has, as part of their HCM practice, sold this performance management service for many years.

There is just nothing new here … the annual performance review has been dead for years, it’s just that there hasn’t been a suitable replacement. Technologies have been available for some time, but their actual application often ends up as a replacement for the more manual review process, except a machine was reminding managers and compiling the info.

Why is any replacement necessary and does the performance review actually matter anymore in a time of extreme self-quantification? Consider your personal health. Chances are you are probably wearing a fitbit or using the Health app on your iPhone (or some other similar technology) to track your steps, exercise or whatever you do for fitness and well being. You likely have some app to monitor you calorie intact (or you are thinking you should start). Aren’t these just simple measurements of the things we know are critical in our lives? We are looking at them daily because longer than that is too long.

Job performance seems the same. In any role, there are only a few recurring actions (habits) that really matter to individual success. Yes, I know some roles are harder to quantify than others, but you can. For those “hard to measure” roles, consider the actions, if not taken, that would lead to eventual failure. If you truly cannot figure it out, then why employ someone to do in the first place?

Once you figure out those daily actions, shouldn’t we be tracking them in real time, or at least daily? There is so much research about the power of habit that govern our success. Successful habits (exercise, meditating, ongoing education/learning, etc.) correlate to future positive results and negative habits (gossip, negative thinking, smoking, obesity) correlate to future poor results. This is not a surprise. So identify the daily habits for each role in your organization and track them (or have your team self-quantify) daily to make the small, incremental changes necessary to grow.

Seems like a much more rational and personally productive way to develop your team and yourself for long term success.

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