Blog – OutMatch https://outmatch.com Hiring, Keeping, and Developing Great Employees Fri, 17 Aug 2018 15:22:19 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.8 Managing High Potential Employees: 9 Derailers to Watch For https://outmatch.com/managing-high-potential-employees/ Tue, 07 Aug 2018 16:26:36 +0000 https://outmatch.com/?p=21834 High-potential employees are your company’s future, and in today’s tight labor market, you can’t afford to lose a single one of them. But here’s the challenge: High potential employees are more likely to leave than average employees. In fact, high…

The post Managing High Potential Employees: 9 Derailers to Watch For appeared first on OutMatch.

]]>
High-potential employees are your company’s future, and in today’s tight labor market, you can’t afford to lose a single one of them. But here’s the challenge: High potential employees are more likely to leave than average employees. In fact, high potentials typically only stay with a company for about two years.

If you can improve your ability to retain and manage high potentials, you’ll benefit from solid business growth and strong performance in the market. If you can’t, then all your energy (and dollars) will be spent replacing good employees.

Being a high potential employee doesn’t mean there’s an easy road ahead.

These employees haven’t proven themselves yet—hence, why they’re called “high potential”—and they will face many challenges as they grow in their careers.

To better manage your high potential employees and help accelerate their development, watch for these potential derailers:

1. Appears stressed, overworked, or beginning to burnout.

2. Resisting change. If the person has been successful a certain way, change may look like a platform for failure.

3. Blaming others for their mistakes or failures. They don’t want to look bad because they know other people’s expectations of them are high.

4. Taking on all the work themselves because that’s what’s made them successful so far. They’re used to being independent and taking the initiative.

5. Lacks trust in his or her team. They’ve been recognized for their work and dedication, and they don’t want to let that go.

6. Spends most of their time completing tasks versus thinking strategically about ways to improve the business.

7. Lacks important knowledge about other functional areas and/or the long-term goals of the organization.

8. Doesn’t seek out opportunities to connect with others, or is unable to effectively engage and influence their superiors.

9. Lacks visibility across the organization.

The people closest to your high potentials—and most likely to spot these derailers—are your organization’s managers. How confident are they that they can mitigate these derailing behaviors? According to a recent poll, only 6 % said “extremely confident.”

Managers have a huge influence on the career trajectory of your high potential employees. For insight on how to equip them to be better coaches, as well as strategies for retaining high potential employees, watch out webinar on-demand: How to Get the Most Out of Your High Potentials

 

The post Managing High Potential Employees: 9 Derailers to Watch For appeared first on OutMatch.

]]>
Culture Fit Versus Culture Add? https://outmatch.com/culture-fit/ Wed, 01 Aug 2018 13:06:59 +0000 https://outmatch.com/?p=21709 Organizational culture is more than a popular talking point. According to a 2018 People Management Report, 84% of employers say that organizational culture is critical to the success of their business. This widely-held belief has sparked countless conversations about organizational culture—including…

The post Culture Fit Versus Culture Add? appeared first on OutMatch.

]]>
Organizational culture is more than a popular talking point. According to a 2018 People Management Report, 84% of employers say that organizational culture is critical to the success of their business. This widely-held belief has sparked countless conversations about organizational culture—including how to define culture, how to measure culture, how to manage culture change, and how to hire for culture fit.

The topic of hiring for culture fit came up in a recent webinar on How to Reinforce Your Culture with a Strong Onboarding Process. I/O expert Chelsea Petrie had an excellent response when asked by an audience member:

Culture fit versus culture add: What are your thoughts on hiring people who fit your culture, versus hiring people who will add to your culture?

This debate that has gotten a lot of attention recently. Culture add has been defined as someone who shares the same values, but can bring something new to the team, while culture fit is often seen as “someone who looks like us and thinks like us.” The underlying concern is that hiring for culture fit will lead to group think, and inadvertently discourage creativity and individuality among employees. This is also a concern in terms of diversity and inclusion in the workforce.

culture fit

Here’s how Chelsea explained culture fit versus culture add:

“When we talk about culture fit, we’re talking about the values that are prioritized the most within an organization…

For example, if you have a highly collaborative, team-oriented work environment, but you’re hiring individuals who don’t prioritize that value, you’re going to have a jangley culture, and it’s going to cause behavioral issues. You might start to see performance lacking, engagement lacking, and turnover occurring.”

 

Chelsea continued by saying, “In the hiring process, I would definitive encourage that employers seek out a strong culture fit, and then look for the culture add piece in any role-specific knowledge, experience, or education that someone would bring to the table. Anything that’s above-and-beyond is fantastic!”

For more insight on maintaining a cohesive culture, along with best practices for effectively onboarding new hires into your culture, check out Chelsea’s full webinar on-demand: How to Reinforce Your Culture with a Strong Onboarding Process

 

The post Culture Fit Versus Culture Add? appeared first on OutMatch.

]]>
Leadership Development Programs https://outmatch.com/leadership-development-programs/ Tue, 24 Jul 2018 11:53:39 +0000 https://outmatch.com/?p=21615 Strategies for Smarter Investments: Leadership Development Programs U.S. companies spend nearly $14 billion annually in leadership development. However, only 6% of leaders say they’re confident that their leadership pipeline is “very ready.” Why are leadership development programs not producing well-equipped…

The post Leadership Development Programs appeared first on OutMatch.

]]>
Strategies for Smarter Investments: Leadership Development Programs

U.S. companies spend nearly $14 billion annually in leadership development. However, only 6% of leaders say they’re confident that their leadership pipeline is “very ready.”

Why are leadership development programs not producing well-equipped leaders? This was the topic of a recent webinar featuring Martin Lanik, author of the business bestseller, The Leader Habit, and Sarah Glass, I/O and leadership development expert. After the presentation, Martin and Sarah answered audience questions on leadership development strategies, leveraging data for leadership development, and more. Learn more with Martin Lanik and Sarah Glass’ Q&A.

 

1. What’s your recommendation on where to target leadership development? In the high potential population, or across all leaders?

Martin: I recommend thinking of leadership development as a funnel. First, you want to assess everybody to get a basic understanding of what you’re working with, and establish a baseline. From there, you start prioritizing. Maybe there are some business needs that are more critical than others, and based on that, you identify in which areas (and in which people) you invest the most money.

For example, you can use a leadership assessment across your leadership population, then use a leadership simulation to on a select group, and reserve your high-touch development strategies, such as executive coaching, for those employees who are most ready to take on critical leadership positions in your organization. The diagnostic piece is really key here. Without any assessment or analytics, you’re going in blind.

2. In leadership development programs, what data is typically shared with the organization versus the individual?

Sarah: Most of the organizations that we work with are leaning toward transparency. The idea is to share as much data as possible with the individual so that that person has an opportunity to understand their own baseline. Data that you share can help generate self-awareness, which is such a critical factor in a person’s development journey. There has to motivation and intent behind development, and the realization that it’s going to lead to a better result. Otherwise, you’re not going to see significant change.

This doesn’t necessarily apply to something like a benchstrength analysis, or anything with data in the aggregate that you’re using to make organizational decisions, but having data that’s visible at the individual level is definitely important.

3. How much additional data do you get from a leadership simulation?

Martin: The benefit of doing a simulation, compared to other types of assessments, is that you see the person in action. Rather than predicting, you’re actually witnessing their behavior. This is especially important when you think about a person’s readiness to move into a next-level position. The simulation allows you to place an engineer or a sales person, for example, into a management position—in a safe environment—and see how they tackle leadership challenges. This is as close as you can get to crystal ball—seeing how successful someone can be and how ready they are.


To learn more about leadership development programs, and your organization’s role in helping leaders form positive leadership habits, watch Martin and Sarah’s webinar on-demand: Transforming Leadership Development From a Program to a Daily Practice

The post Leadership Development Programs appeared first on OutMatch.

]]>
Company Culture: How to Make It Your Competitive Advantage https://outmatch.com/company-culture-how-to-make-it-your-competitive-advantage/ Mon, 16 Jul 2018 14:08:30 +0000 https://outmatch.com/?p=21578 Company Culture Q&A with Catherine Spence In today’s highly competitive business landscape, 84% of companies believe that company culture is critical to the success of their business.* Catherine Spence, co-founder and head of product at Pomello, would agree. Pomello, an OutMatch…

The post Company Culture: How to Make It Your Competitive Advantage appeared first on OutMatch.

]]>
Company Culture Q&A with Catherine Spence

In today’s highly competitive business landscape, 84% of companies believe that company culture is critical to the success of their business.*

Catherine Spence, co-founder and head of product at Pomello, would agree. Pomello, an OutMatch company, is a culture analytics provider that helps companies understand and hire based on their unique CultureDNA™. In a recent webinar, Catherine answered audience questions on the importance of demonstrating cultural values, managing culture in a decentralized business, and hiring for culture fit.

1. What’s the impact on company culture when espoused values don’t align with demonstrated values?

Espoused values are things that might appear on the wall or in your annual report, but if they’re not lived or demonstrated, especially at the leadership level, it can be very damaging. It lowers employee engagement and creates confusion. You’ll see a breakdown in cultural alignment because employees are getting mixed messages about what’s important and what the culture really is. Living your values is critical, and you cannot pursue a culture initiative without having the buy-in of leaders. It also has to be aligned in the messaging and daily activities of your organization.

2. How do you manage company culture in a consulting business, where most employees work at client sites?

What’s interesting to note here is that company culture over distance still exists. The leaders that you have are still there. What you don’t have are leaders showing you on a daily basis how to live the culture. So, be proactive and thoughtful in your communication. For example, make sure that consulting wins are contextualized in values that you’re cultivating. Some companies that have been fully remote for almost their entire existence have some of the strongest organizational cultures because they pay so much attention to it.

3. What are some questions you can ask during an interview to get insight into a candidate’s values or culture mindset?

We recommend asking open-ended behavioral questions, particularly in the context of organizational culture. For example, if your company is highly focused on customer orientation, ask a candidate to give you an example of a time when he/she listened to a customer and it changed their behavior or response, and what did that feel like? What was their reaction? You can dig deeper and see if being customer focused is something that the candidate naturally geared to do.


To learn more about the five key questions that will uncover your company’s unique CultureDNA™, how to use your CultureDNA™ to maximize employee engagement, and how to connect engagement analytics to performance metrics, check out Catherine’s webinar on-demand: CultureDNA™: How to Measure, Endorse, and Turn it into Your Competitive Advantage.

*People Management 2018 Industry Report

The post Company Culture: How to Make It Your Competitive Advantage appeared first on OutMatch.

]]>
Onboarding Best Practices: Making Your Company Culture “Stick” https://outmatch.com/onboarding-best-practices-making-your-company-culture-stick/ Fri, 13 Jul 2018 15:15:31 +0000 https://outmatch.com/?p=21598 Onboarding Best Practices with Chelsea Petrie When asked how well their talent acquisition processes reflect their company culture, only only 1 in 4 employers answered “very well.” That when I/O expert Chelsea Petrie, Talent Strategy Partner at OutMatch, shared her…

The post Onboarding Best Practices: Making Your Company Culture “Stick” appeared first on OutMatch.

]]>
Onboarding Best Practices with Chelsea Petrie

When asked how well their talent acquisition processes reflect their company culture, only only 1 in 4 employers answered “very well.”

That when I/O expert Chelsea Petrie, Talent Strategy Partner at OutMatch, shared her insight on how to improve employee retention, reduce ramp-up time, and increase engagement—all through a strong, culture-focused onboarding program. In the Q and A following her presentation, Chelsea answered audience questions about training, onboarding best practices, and cultural disconnects.

1. What types of metrics do companies use to monitor onboarding success?

There are three important ones:

Ramp-up time: When you identify certain milestones that an employee should hit in order to be effective in their job, you can track whether are or not they are on target. That’s a really key indicator.

Turnover: If you’re seeing a significantly higher turnover of new hires in the first 90 days, there’s likely a problem with your onboarding process.

Employee feedback: Use a survey tool or ask for direct feedback from your new hires. They can give you great insight into what’s working and what’s not.

2. What’s the difference between new hire training and onboarding?

Training does take up a significant portion of the onboarding process, because you have to include job-specific training to ensure that new employees get up to speed quickly. But, training and onboarding aren’t the same thing. Training is tactical, where you’re teaching employees to understand their roles and responsibilities. Onboarding is about the overall experience of being welcomed into an organization, connecting with the company’s culture and purpose, and building those initial bonds with the people they’re going to be working with. Think about how you want new employees to feel during the onboarding process, and create an experience that reflects that.

3. Are there ways to identify cultural disconnects or detractors during the onboarding experience?

The best thing you can do is ensure that a candidate is a good fit before the onboarding process begins. You do this by communicating your company culture throughout the hiring process, and making sure the candidate is fully bought in. But realistically, you’re going to have some individuals slip through the cracks. Culture is made tangible through behaviors, so looking at a new hire’s behavior is an indicator of how well they embody the values of your organization. For example, if your organization values collaboration, but new hires aren’t following through on tasks to meet with others, or they’re not taking initiative to build relationships, you’ll know there’s a red flag.


To learn more about onboarding best practices, and the payoff of a strong onboarding process, watch Chelsea’s webinar on-demand: How to Reinforce Your Culture with a Strong Onboarding Process

The post Onboarding Best Practices: Making Your Company Culture “Stick” appeared first on OutMatch.

]]>
Business Strategy and Organizational Culture: Tips on Aligning Them https://outmatch.com/business-strategy-and-organizational-culture/ Tue, 05 Jun 2018 19:37:03 +0000 https://outmatch.com/?p=21472 Business strategy and organizational culture: See why the conversation about talent and people is a business conversation, not just an HR conversation. Read now or listen to our Podcast!

The post Business Strategy and Organizational Culture: Tips on Aligning Them appeared first on OutMatch.

]]>
How to make organizational culture a business conversation, not an HR conversation

In episode 6 of the Talent Playbook Podcast, we’re joined by Tony Bridwell, author, speaker, and the Chief People Officer at Ryan, LLC. With more than 2,300 employees, Ryan is the world’s largest tax consulting company, and #71 on this year’s Fortune 100 Best Companies to Work For.

What’s the secret to becoming a Best Company to Work For? Bridwell says it’s about putting your people first. At Ryan, people are first on the company’s “big four results,” followed by clients, revenue, and IBITA. Here’s why, according to Bridwell:

You take care of your people. Your people take care of your clients. Your clients provide revenue, and if you run the business well, then you get an IBITA.”

Bridwell says that these big four results drive every decision he makes. “If I’m not hiring the right people and I lose them in 6 months or a year, that costs the firm money, which hits bottom line. From a revenue standpoint, I lose connectivity with clients, it hurts productivity, and the people experience is bad. A bad hire hits every one of my key results. Same goes for development and total rewards. If I lose people because they’re not being developed, or because the compensation isn’t right, it hits every one of my key results.”

Bridwell continues by saying that the conversation about talent and people at Ryan is a business conversation, not an HR conversation. When it comes to driving business results, the formula at Ryan is “Structure follows strategy—and culture supports it all.” Here’s how Bridwell puts it:

“If you don’t realign the structure of the organization to deliver the business strategy, you’ll end up ‘muscling a result.’ This happens so frequently. There are organizational structures that haven’t changed in years, but each year there are new strategies. People understand the strategy part because that’s what they’re taught in school. But rarely will they modify the organizational structure to deliver that strategy, and almost never will they check and adjust the company culture. When I meet with the COO and CEO at Ryan, we’re constantly talking about the cultural barriers  that will prevent us from delivering our business strategy.

The single largest strategic initiative in our firm this year is our cultural reset. We are completely resetting our company culture to deliver the biggest growth we’ve ever seen in our firm’s history.”

Read more about Tony Bridwell’s work at tonybridwell.com, or listen to the full interview on the Talent Playbook Podcast.

The post Business Strategy and Organizational Culture: Tips on Aligning Them appeared first on OutMatch.

]]>
Company Culture Handbook: 5 Reasons to Write One https://outmatch.com/company-culture-handbook/ Fri, 01 Jun 2018 16:13:47 +0000 https://outmatch.com/?p=21450 Your company culture handbook should be something that employees are constantly interacting with and contributing to. It should fun, engaging, and have information that’s valuable to new hires and current employees alike. Let OutMatch help you learn the steps to writing one.

The post Company Culture Handbook: 5 Reasons to Write One appeared first on OutMatch.

]]>
Writing a Company Culture Handbook is Not Like Writing an Employee Handbook.

A company culture handbook goes beyond company policies and PTO. Unlike the employee handbook, which often ends up collecting dust in the back of a desk drawer somewhere, your company culture handbook should be something that employees are constantly interacting with and contributing to. It should fun, engaging, and have information that’s valuable to new hires and current employees alike.

Think of your company culture handbook as a living, breathing touchstone of your company’s culture—which, by the way, exists in your organization whether you’ve defined it or not. In a recent webinar on How to Measure Your CultureDNA™, culture expert Catherine Spence defined company culture as:

A social influence system that already operates within your organization. If you don’t manage your culture, this social influence system can actually undermine your ability to effectively execute business strategy.”

That’s why culture has been getting so much attention in boardrooms around the world. In order to manage your company culture, you first have to understand what your culture is now, and what you want it to be in the future. Writing a company culture handbook is the perfect opportunity to work through these important questions, and in the process, create a valuable document for your organization.

Here are five more benefits you’ll get out of writing a company culture handbook:

  1. Demonstrate your commitment to creating a strong company culture. 
  2. Clearly define your purpose (the reason your company exists), and the impact you want to have on the world. 
  3. Educate current and incoming employees—at scale!—about the way work gets done in your company. 
  4. Empower employees to make independent decisions that align with your business strategy.
  5. Capture your company’s unique culture, with values and traditions that are true to you (and not adopted just because they sound good)

Writing a company culture handbook that’s an authentic representation of your culture doesn’t happen overnight. To guide you in this process, check out 7 Steps to Writing a Culture Handbook.

The post Company Culture Handbook: 5 Reasons to Write One appeared first on OutMatch.

]]>
Company Culture and Cultural Issues https://outmatch.com/company-culture-and-cultural-issues/ Fri, 11 May 2018 13:31:48 +0000 https://outmatch.com/?p=21306 Diversity and inclusion is an important focus for many organizations. But at its core, D&I is about more than maintaining equal numbers of individuals from different groups. You can fill your quota, so to speak, but what are you doing…

The post Company Culture and Cultural Issues appeared first on OutMatch.

]]>
Diversity and inclusion is an important focus for many organizations. But at its core, D&I is about more than maintaining equal numbers of individuals from different groups. You can fill your quota, so to speak, but what are you doing at a company culture level to be a truly inclusive employer?

This was the topic of conversation for our company culture experts, Oliver Staehelin and Catherine Spence, who were recently featured on Business Radio “In the Workplace” by The Wharton School of Business.

What cultural markers lead to issues such as gender inequality?

Catherine and Oliver answered by explaining how measuring cultural values and alignment can reveal high-risk red flags where companies need to investigate what’s going within their organization.

Catherine: “What we’re asking employees is to observe the culture around them. We ask them things like, ‘What behaviors are valued and rewarded your organization?’ If we get different answers from men and women — for example, if women don’t feel that there’s a highly collaberative environment, but men do — then that indicates there’s some dynamic at play that’s separating the experience of men and women.

“There might be additional pieces of data that can be pulled in, like unequal promotion practices, for example, or higher turnover rate for women. So when we layer our data onto additional data that’s accessible to HR teams, we can really paint a picture with concrete clues for what might be going on in this company. Then we can structure some targeted questions that would be worth exploring in a focus group setting.”

Oliver: “Transparency is another marker of gender-related issues in the workplace. This happens when the flow of information may not be making its way to all folks and stakeholders in a similar fashion. There might be a small group that’s retaining all of the information and therefore isolating the rest of the organization.”

What risk factors make a company more susceptible to gender inequality?

Catherine: “Companies that start out with a commitment to diversity and inclusion very early on tend to put themselves in a better position down the line. It is a lot harder to change course with your culture and cultural practices once things have already been embedded. So for companies that are in that early-stage growth phase, it is immensely beneficial to focus on diversity and inclusion early on. Having visible female executives is a really powerful signal and really does make a difference in terms of influencing the company culture.”

To listen to the full interview, check out Wharton Business Radio: In The Workplace with Oliver Staehelin and Catherine Spence

The post Company Culture and Cultural Issues appeared first on OutMatch.

]]>
5 Things HR Leaders Should Know about GDPR https://outmatch.com/5-things-hr-leaders-should-know-about-gdpr/ Wed, 09 May 2018 20:29:39 +0000 https://outmatch.com/?p=21269 Not only must employers comply with new regulations according GDPR, but they must also ensure that all HR tech or SaaS vendors they work with are in compliance as well. When it comes to data security and data privacy, here's what employers should expect from their Data Processors, or software vendors.

The post 5 Things HR Leaders Should Know about GDPR appeared first on OutMatch.

]]>
The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is bringing a great wave of change to companies worldwide. With stricter rules around data privacy, security, and accountability – effective May 25, 2018 – companies in and outside the EU are making data protection a top priority.

GDPR will reach far beyond the EU (where the law is taking effect), as its regulations apply to all companies that process personal data of European citizens. That could mean a candidate applying to your company, or an existing employee residing in the EU, even if you’re a US-based employer.

HR handles huge amounts of personal data, so the race is on to identify potential GDPR compliance issues. It’s likely that your HR organization is (or will be) completing business process inventories and making changes in the way you address the rights of data subjects, data retention rules, and more.

And here’s another important consideration: Not only must you comply with GDPR, you must also ensure that all HR tech or SaaS vendors you work with are in compliance as well. Last year, OutMatch began working with TrustArc, a leading privacy compliance and risk assessment company, to assess our readiness for GDPR. This has helped us, as a Data Processor, to identify operational enhancements that should be made before the new regulations take effect.

Things HR Leaders Should Know About HR

Here are a few keys things that you, the Data Controller – and by extension your Data Processors – will be held accountable for when it comes to GDPR. (There are more considerations than this, but these will help get you thinking about the right questions to ask when evaluating your vendors).

1. Lawful Basis for Processing Data

To collect and process data of EU residents, you must have a legal basis for doing so. Under GDPR, you can do this by obtaining consent from Data Subjects, or by processing data for the purposes of legitimate interests pursued by the Data Controller. You’ll see consent is a common approach in scenarios such as marketing, but it’s not our recommendation for HR data. While you should always check with your company’s data protection officers and legal counsel, we expect most of our clients to use pursuit of legitimate interests (hiring and developing great employees!) as their legal basis for processing data.

2. Cross-Border Data Transfers

According to GDPR, you must have a lawful basis for transferring personal data from the European Economic Area (EEA) to countries such as the US. There are a few ways to do this. At OutMatch we use Standard Contractual Clauses (also referred to as Model Clauses), which describe the data we collect and transfer on behalf of our clients, how we protect it, etc. We append this to our agreements with clients who request it, and this provides the lawful basis for transferring data. Soon, OutMatch will add support for the Privacy Shield Framework, which will provide a second means of transfer, without the need for a contractual addendum.

3. Rights of Data Subjects

This involves the right of Data Subjects to be notified of the purposes for which their personal data will be processed, the right to access and change their personal data, and the “right to be forgotten,” along with several other rights. At OutMatch, we have internal processes set up and ready to help you handle these rights management requests when you receive them.

4. Data Security

Security under GDPR means not only protecting personal data, but also making sure it’s available, accessible, and used solely for its intended purpose. OutMatch protects data using industry best practices such as encryption in transit and encryption at rest, as well as securely developing and testing our software and regularly scanning our systems for vulnerabilities. We make sure data is available using redundant servers in our data centers, regular backups, and we have a disaster recovery site and plan in the event of a major incident. We also make commitments to clients and individuals through our privacy policy that our use of personal data is limited to the purposes for which it was collected, and we enforce the same commitments on our partners.

5. Records of Processing Activities

This states that you must keep records of processing activities that involve personal data. As one of your Data Processors, we’ve mapped all of our processes involving your candidates’ and employees’ personal data into ready-to-use templates, which you can use as part of your business process inventories, or in your privacy and/or data protection impact assessments.

The Bottom Line

When it comes to the considerations above, or anything related to GDPR, OutMatch has you covered. If you’d like to learn more about data processing and GDPR, please contact us. We’re happy to answer any questions you have.

The post 5 Things HR Leaders Should Know about GDPR appeared first on OutMatch.

]]>
Company Culture Questions https://outmatch.com/company-culture-questions/ Mon, 07 May 2018 15:48:06 +0000 https://outmatch.com/?p=21252 Employers everywhere are paying close attention to company culture. But 'company culture' is hard to define and can mean so many things. To get a better grasp on culture, here are three of the most common company culture questions.

The post Company Culture Questions appeared first on OutMatch.

]]>
Employers everywhere are paying close attention to company culture. But the term ‘company culture’ can mean so many things. Are company values synonymous with culture? Do perks, like ping pong tables or team lunches, create stronger cultures? And can a company culture get too homogeneous, to the point where it stops evolving?

To answer these questions, let’s get back to the basics with a quick Culture Q&A. Here are three of the most common company culture questions:

What is culture, exactly?

Company culture is a system of shared values defining what is important, and norms, defining appropriate attitudes and behaviors for employees within an organization. In other words, your values, whether expressly stated or interpreted based on rewards and recognition, are the roots that your culture grows from, spurring the development of norms, behaviors, and other cultural activities.

If values tend to be conceptual in nature, then norms and behaviors become the building blocks that characterize your culture and give your values meaning. Take innovation as a value, for example. What does innovation mean in terms of behavior? At OutMatch, we’d say that innovative cultures are characterized by employees who are willing to experiment, who are comfortable with risk, and who are quick to take initiative—these are the behaviors that underpin the value of innovation.

How can we manage corporate culture?

While culture as a concept may seem a bit intangible, it is something that can be managed (even on a large scale). Traditionally, companies have managed culture thorough 1:1 interactions, consistent communication, and alignment of incentive systems. More recently, new survey and analytics tools have emerged to help capture and measure company culture, which is a key challenge, especially for companies with large, decentralized workforces. The more insight a company can get about its culture, the more proactive leadership can be in aligning talent management strategies to meet and reflect that culture.

What’s the difference between employee engagement and culture?

The terms culture and engagement are often used interchangeably. They both involve an employee’s relationship with their workplace, but there is an important distinction:

Employee engagement is how employees FEEL, whereas culture is what employees BELIEVE and how they ACT.

Engagement is more volatile and can fluctuate from day to day. Culture, on the other hand, is deeply rooted and slow to change. Looking at the relationship between culture and engagement, you’ll see that cultural strength predicts employee engagement. A blow to engagement on a team with a strong culture will rebound over time. Which makes sense: If employees are highly aligned around the beliefs, values, behaviors, and incentives that drive how they act in the workplace, then strong alignment will lead to less social friction and higher productivity, which in turn leads to higher employee engagement on average. Low engagement accompanied by a trend toward lower cultural strength, however, means there’s a breakdown in beliefs and behaviors happening on that team.

To learn more about why culture matters, and how to successfully onboard new hires into your company culture, check out our webinar: How to Reinforce Your Culture with a Strong Onboarding Process.

Company Culture Questions

The post Company Culture Questions appeared first on OutMatch.

]]>
OutMatch is Cleaning House and Building Homes https://outmatch.com/outmatch-is-cleaning-house-and-building-homes/ Tue, 01 May 2018 18:00:30 +0000 https://outmatch.com/?p=21230 OutMatch donates $1,400 to Dallas Habitat for Humanity after an office-wide silent auction Excitement is building at OutMatch as we prepare to move to a brand new office space in Dallas, TX. An office move is no small task, so we started…

The post OutMatch is Cleaning House and Building Homes appeared first on OutMatch.

]]>
OutMatch donates $1,400 to Dallas Habitat for Humanity after an office-wide silent auction

Excitement is building at OutMatch as we prepare to move to a brand new office space in Dallas, TX. An office move is no small task, so we started with a big office clean out. We put several office items—including desks, chairs, tables, artwork, even a couple kegerators—up for auction, with 100% of the proceeds going to Dallas Habitat for Humanity. The idea is that a new home for OutMatch means a new home for a family in need.

The auction wrapped up on Friday afternoon, and we’re thrilled to have raised $1,400 for Dallas Habitat for Humanity. Hot items included back-lit dry erase boards, projectors, and of course the kegerators, which sold for $175 each.

OutMatch has lived many lives and been through several metamorphoses since we first moved into the Park Central Towers (our current office building) 15 years ago. We’ve experienced tremendous growth in recent years, merging with HR tech solution Chequed.com in 2015, and acquiring culture analytics firm Pomello in 2018. We’re looking forward to spreading our wings and starting fresh in a brand new space that will reinforce our culture of Connectedness, and help us fulfill our commitment to Transforming the World of Work.

The post OutMatch is Cleaning House and Building Homes appeared first on OutMatch.

]]>
Integrate a Pre-Hire Assessment with Your ATS https://outmatch.com/3-reasons-to-integrate-a-pre-hire-assessment-with-your-ats/ Tue, 17 Apr 2018 17:45:15 +0000 https://outmatch.com/?p=21100 3 Reasons Why You Should Integrate a Pre-Hire Assessment with Your ATS Pre-hire assessments deliver predictive analytics on job and culture fit, providing a crucial layer of insight into your applicant pool. When you you integrate an assessment with your…

The post Integrate a Pre-Hire Assessment with Your ATS appeared first on OutMatch.

]]>
3 Reasons Why You Should Integrate a Pre-Hire Assessment with Your ATS

Pre-hire assessments deliver predictive analytics on job and culture fit, providing a crucial layer of insight into your applicant pool. When you you integrate an assessment with your applicant tracking system, your talent acquisition teams can access these analytics directly within your ATS platform.

Speed to useful information is the key gain. An integration allowed our team to move faster. Without it, our tools were not going to be as effective.”

-Clay Stallings, VP of Talent Acquisition and Development at Acceptance Auto Insurance

About 90% of the companies we talk to already have an applicant tracking system in place, and more small and medium sized business are adopting pre-hire assessments after seeing how valuable they have been for enterprise organizations.

Whether you’re using an assessment for the first time, or considering a new vendor, integration is going to be a key concern. Many companies require that all tools and technologies integrate with their core HR systems, but if you’re on the fence, here are the top three reasons to integrate an assessment with your ATS:

1. Seamless candidate experience. Having an integrated assessment keeps candidates engaged, and makes the application and assessment one simple, seamless process. Candidates stay plugged into your ATS, and you reduce the risk of drop-off as you’re not requiring them to jump from one system to another.

2. Greater recruiter efficiency. With an integrated assessment, recruiters will see a shortlist of top candidates for the job, along with job match scores, candidate rankings, and more—right within your ATS. The ease-of-use, plus the tremendous time savings in early screening results in a highly efficient recruiting process.

3. Competitive edge in recruiting. OutMatch Assessment provides recruiters and hiring managers with critical data on culture fit, as well as a candidate’s likelihood of success in the role. By integrating the assessment into your process, you greatly sharpen your team’s decision making capabilities, and give your organization a competitive edge in identifying and selecting top talent.

To learn more about ATS integration, check out our 1-pager: 5 Reasons to Integrate OutMatch with your ATS. Or, to learn more about adding predictive analytics to your selection process, download our eBook: The Essential Guide to Predictive Talent Analytics.

   

The post Integrate a Pre-Hire Assessment with Your ATS appeared first on OutMatch.

]]>