FAQ – OutMatch https://outmatch.com Hiring, Keeping, and Developing Great Employees Thu, 19 Apr 2018 15:12:24 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.5 When Should I Assess? https://outmatch.com/when-should-i-assess/ https://outmatch.com/when-should-i-assess/#comments_reply Fri, 29 Jul 2016 08:00:14 +0000 https://outmatch.com/?p=13661 Timing matters when it comes to implementing an assessment. Should it be part of the initial application process, or should it come later, after the screening call, for example? Should everyone take the assessment, or only select candidates? These are important questions to…

The post When Should I Assess? appeared first on OutMatch.

]]>
Timing matters when it comes to implementing an assessment. Should it be part of the initial application process, or should it come later, after the screening call, for example? Should everyone take the assessment, or only select candidates?

These are important questions to ask. Whether you combine the assessment with an existing step in your hiring process, or add a new step for assessing candidates, it will inevitably impact your candidate experience. But not all candidates need to have the same candidate experience, and the workflow you choose will depend on your candidate pool and the type of role you’re filling.

High-Volume/Hourly Roles

When hiring for high volume roles like retail cashiers or restaurant servers, for example, the assessment is done early in the application process, and might even be an integrated part of the application (meaning all candidates will complete the assessment before submitting their application). This workflow will lengthen the application process for candidates, but not significantly because hourly assessments are shorter than professional assessments and take about 10-15 minutes to complete.

Benefits:

  • Helps recruiters and hiring manager quickly filter through a large pool of candidates
  • Saves times by prioritizing candidates who are most likely to succeed in the role

Low-Volume/Professional Roles

When hiring for low-volume or professional level roles like store managers, for example, candidates are invited to take the assessment after passing an initial screening process. This gives recruiters and hiring managers the chance to review applications and other criteria, and also communicate with candidates before the assessment. Professional assessments require more time (usually 20+ minutes), but being invited to take the assessment based on their qualifications for the job can help boost candidate completion rates.

Benefits:

  • Requires a time commitment only from candidates who are qualified to move forward
  • Allows for personal interaction with the employer before completing the assessment

One of the great benefits of using assessments is that you can use the results to conduct better interviews. So no matter where you place the assessment, make sure it’s early enough in your hiring process to provide insight at each of the following stages.

The post When Should I Assess? appeared first on OutMatch.

]]>
https://outmatch.com/when-should-i-assess/feed/ 0
Why All the Weird Questions? https://outmatch.com/why-all-the-weird-questions/ https://outmatch.com/why-all-the-weird-questions/#comments_reply Mon, 11 Jul 2016 14:00:11 +0000 https://outmatch.com/?p=13341 You make decisions as you go rather than plan everything in advance. Agree or Disagree? If you’ve ever taken a personality assessment as part of the application process for a job, then you’ve probably wondered what these kinds of questions…

The post Why All the Weird Questions? appeared first on OutMatch.

]]>
You make decisions as you go rather than plan everything in advance. Agree or Disagree?

If you’ve ever taken a personality assessment as part of the application process for a job, then you’ve probably wondered what these kinds of questions are getting at—and what your answers might be saying about you.

Maybe you’re not on the job market anymore, but if you’re involved in HR, chances are you use some type of assessment for hiring. Do you ever wonder how questions like this can generate concrete data about someone’s work style and potential to succeed?

Let’s revisit the question above for a sneak peak at the science behind our assessments.

This particular question measures the trait of work organization or conscientiousness. We use this question to see if the candidate is more of a planner (someone who is methodical, careful, and anticipates long-term outcomes), or more free-form (someone who is comfortable with shifts in priorities and is more likely to go with the flow).

Keep in mind, this is just one question that measures work organization/conscientiousness. It’s important to ask several different questions around the same theme to get a more comprehensive view of the candidate. Looking at the response to a single question won’t give you a very good sense of the candidate’s personality overall, or how they compare to other working professionals.

In evaluating these responses, it’s important to look for ideal ranges, rather than high or low scores. You might assume that high work organization is a good thing in any job, but being too high on this trait might mean that the candidate has trouble in situations where they need to react spontaneously. The ideal range will vary depending on the job, but mid-range scores or a balance of high and low scores are usually best.

Want to get a feel for the full assessment experience? Sign up for a demo, or try out an assessment by taking one yourself.

This post is part of our FAQs series, where you can learn about the inner-workings of our assessments, as well as best practices to help improve your hiring process.

The post Why All the Weird Questions? appeared first on OutMatch.

]]>
https://outmatch.com/why-all-the-weird-questions/feed/ 0
Can ‘Fun’ Assessments Be Functional? https://outmatch.com/can-fun-assessments-be-functional/ https://outmatch.com/can-fun-assessments-be-functional/#comments_reply Wed, 22 Jun 2016 13:00:22 +0000 https://outmatch.com/?p=13398 If you’re in HR, then you’ve probably come across a new wave of talent assessments that try a simplified approach to gathering information about candidates. Ever heard of the Draw-A-Dog Scale? It’s used to measure children’s cognitive development, but similar visual assessments are making their way into…

The post Can ‘Fun’ Assessments Be Functional? appeared first on OutMatch.

]]>
If you’re in HR, then you’ve probably come across a new wave of talent assessments that try a simplified approach to gathering information about candidates. Ever heard of the Draw-A-Dog Scale? It’s used to measure children’s cognitive development, but similar visual assessments are making their way into the world of talent selection.

Recently, a client asked us about a 2 minute picture-based personality assessment. They wanted to know why we don’t implement something similar, and why our assessments take so long (8-15 minutes, typically) in comparison.

Who doesn’t love pictures? But we want to be sure that the assessments our clients use are going to add real value to the selection process. So here are a few things to watch out for as you evaluate different assessment methods.

  • Too general. If the same set of questions is used for every job, whether it’s a hotel desk clerk or a VP of operations, then the assessment probably casts too wide a net and won’t be able to accurately predict performance for any specific role.
  • Irrelevant questions. Questions that aren’t related to the job only create noise in the selection process. Plus, someone applying for a customer service job, for example, will probably be confused by a question asking them about their interest in nature.
  • Potential bias. The problem with pictures and symbols is that they can mean different things in different cultures and groups… For instance, are men more likely to endorse images of other men? And if so, what do you learn from that?
  • High vs. low scores. If the scoring is too simplified, for example, someone who agrees with all the statements get the maximum score, then the assessment is really only measuring how agreeable they are, not how well they’ll perform in the role.

For an assessment to truly add value (and be legally defensible), there should be a clear link between assessment scores and job performance. In other words, candidates who score well on the assessment actually perform better in the role, which means your selection criteria is aligned with the job competencies that lead to success.

What we like about some of these new assessments is that they provide a streamlined, mobile-friendly experience. And we agree that a visually appealing design is more engaging for candidates, but style can’t replace substance. That’s why we recommend a scientifically sound assessment in a fresh, candidate-focused interface.

This post is part of our FAQs series, where you can learn about the inner-workings of our assessments, as well as best practices to help improve your hiring process.

The post Can ‘Fun’ Assessments Be Functional? appeared first on OutMatch.

]]>
https://outmatch.com/can-fun-assessments-be-functional/feed/ 0
EEOC and Assessments… Friend or Foe? https://outmatch.com/eeoc-assessments-friend-foe/ https://outmatch.com/eeoc-assessments-friend-foe/#comments_reply Fri, 03 Jun 2016 16:25:47 +0000 https://outmatch.com/?p=13322 There are many things to consider when choosing an assessment. Is it relevant for the job? How accurate and reliable is it? And what about legal defensibly? No employer wants to be at odds with the Equal Opportunity Employment Commission (EEOC), so…

The post EEOC and Assessments… Friend or Foe? appeared first on OutMatch.

]]>
There are many things to consider when choosing an assessment. Is it relevant for the job? How accurate and reliable is it? And what about legal defensibly?

No employer wants to be at odds with the Equal Opportunity Employment Commission (EEOC), so it’s important to keep your hiring practices transparent and fair. When it comes to assessments, how do you know the one you implement won’t unintentionally discriminate against candidates?

Link personality traits to the job  

A validated assessment is the best way to protect yourself from charges of hiring bias. Validation ensures that the assessment is measuring what it’s supposed to be measuring (personality traits like sociability or integrity, for example). Validation also proves whether the items being measured in the assessment actually impact job performance (by documenting the relationship between assessment scores and job performance for a specific role).

What does the EEOC have to say?

When it comes to recruitment, hiring, and promotion, the EEOC has some clear cut guidelines in place:

  • Analyze the duties, functions, and competencies relevant to jobs.
  • Create objective, job-related qualification standards related to those duties, functions, and competencies.
  • Make sure these standards are consistently applied when choosing among candidates.
  • Make sure that selection criteria do not disproportionately exclude certain groups, unless the criteria are valid predictors of successful job performance and meet the employer’s business needs. For example, if educational requirements disproportionately exclude certain minority or racial groups, they may be illegal if not important for job performance or business needs.

Are OutMatch assessments EEOC friendly?

Yes, thanks to careful research and good science—so as long as you use the right assessment for the role, and follow other EEOC guidelines, you’ll be in good shape.

Personality assessments are becoming standard practice in talent selection, and that makes it a popular market for HR technology firms, start-ups, and I-O practitioners. With more vendors in the game, finding an assessment that measures job fit (apart from other aspects of personality) is no easy task, but we’re here to help put your mind at ease. Whether you choose an assessment that’s validated against existing industry and job success data, or do a detailed job analysis for the role, you have options. We’ll work with you to provide the legal defensibly you need, and regularly monitor for adverse impact to help keep you in compliance.

This post is part of our FAQs series, where you can learn about the inner-workings of our assessments, as well as best practices to help improve your hiring process.

The post EEOC and Assessments… Friend or Foe? appeared first on OutMatch.

]]>
https://outmatch.com/eeoc-assessments-friend-foe/feed/ 0
How Do I Choose an Assessment? https://outmatch.com/how-do-i-choose-an-assessment/ https://outmatch.com/how-do-i-choose-an-assessment/#comments_reply Tue, 31 May 2016 15:00:34 +0000 https://outmatch.com/?p=13266 Everyone in HR is concerned about candidates experience (and rightly so!), but taking the assessment is actually the easy part. Choosing the assessment that will help identify who gets hired in your organization—well, that can impact the performance of your entire…

The post How Do I Choose an Assessment? appeared first on OutMatch.

]]>
Everyone in HR is concerned about candidates experience (and rightly so!), but taking the assessment is actually the easy part. Choosing the assessment that will help identify who gets hired in your organization—well, that can impact the performance of your entire company.

And there’s a lot to it. It’s not always clear how the questions in an assessment can generate data about a candidate’s personality, their innate traits and tendencies, and the behaviors they’re likely to exhibit at work. Understanding the inner-workings of an assessment requires knowledge of statistics and psychology. Then, there’s legal issues to consider

It might sound intimidating, but information is power, and as soon as you know what kind of data an assessment can deliver, and how to interpret the results, you’ll wonder how you ever made a hiring decision without it.

To help HR professionals evaluate assessment methods, the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) provides four key criteria:

  • Validity: Does the assessment accurately predict job performance?
  • Adverse impact: Do protected groups (like minorities, females, and individuals over 40) score as well as others on the assessment?
  • Cost: Does the ROI justify the cost to develop and administer the assessment?
  • Applicant reactions: Do applicants react positively versus negatively to the assessment?

SHRM reports that validity is the most important consideration in evaluating an assessment method, and we agree. Validity tells you how well the assessment is measuring what it’s supposed to be measuring (a trait like teamwork or multitasking, for instance). It also tells you how well the items being measured correlate to job qualifications and requirements.

As a general rule, it’s a good idea to layer on different types of assessments so that you’re measuring soft skills like resilience and decisive judgement, as well as hard skills like critical thinking and abstract reasoning.

Using the right assessment (or assessments) can greatly enhance the quality and productivity of your workforce, and it’s a great first step toward a culture of better hiring practices.

This post is part of our FAQs series, where you can learn about the inner-workings of our assessments, as well as best practices to help improve your hiring process.

The post How Do I Choose an Assessment? appeared first on OutMatch.

]]>
https://outmatch.com/how-do-i-choose-an-assessment/feed/ 0
Should I Customize the Assessment? https://outmatch.com/should-i-customize-the-assessment/ https://outmatch.com/should-i-customize-the-assessment/#comments_reply Fri, 27 May 2016 09:00:42 +0000 https://outmatch.com/?p=13230 To answer that question, you have to consider the “uniqueness” factor. It’s natural to think the role you’re hiring for is unique, especially if you’ve done the work to connect the job description to your company’s unique culture and values. (And…

The post Should I Customize the Assessment? appeared first on OutMatch.

]]>
To answer that question, you have to consider the “uniqueness” factor. It’s natural to think the role you’re hiring for is unique, especially if you’ve done the work to connect the job description to your company’s unique culture and values. (And that’s important because you want to differentiate your employment brand and attract the right type of talent to your door!)

You have to take a hard look at what the job requires, specifically the competencies that lead to success. If you’re hiring for a well-known job that exists across many companies, like a call center agent, you can probably use a standard competency model, or success profile, to predict who will preform well in that role. If you’re hiring for a truly unique or specialized role, like a Disney Imagineer, then you might need a success profile that’s tailored to specific needs of that position.

At OutMatch, we’ve compiled a job success profile library that scales across 900 jobs. Using a standard profile, you can leverage our data from similar companies within your industry and use it to predict success for new hires in your organization. These standard profiles have been validated using job task and work environment data specific to the industry and the role. For jobs that are more unique, the success profiles can be tailored to fit your unique culture and performance expectations.

Here’s an example: say you’re hiring hourly employees for a restaurant. Based on our research and experience with clients, we know what makes people successful in a typical front or back of house role. The standard success profile will include attributes like sociability, resilience, and multitasking. But if your particular restaurant is focused on promotions and upselling, the ability to influence guests might be more important for bottom line performance. In that case, the success profile can be tailored so that this attribute is weighted more heavily in the assessment.

Tailoring the success profile in this way will maximize the assessment’s ability to predict success, and doesn’t require you to build a custom assessment, which can be expensive and hard to scale. So don’t worry about reinventing the wheel. Whether you’re looking for off-the-shelf assessments or tailored options, we’re here to help you hire the very best!

This post is part of our FAQs series, where you can learn about the inner-workings of our assessments, as well as best practices to help improve your hiring process.

The post Should I Customize the Assessment? appeared first on OutMatch.

]]>
https://outmatch.com/should-i-customize-the-assessment/feed/ 0
Will a Long Assessment Cause Higher Drop Off? https://outmatch.com/long-assessment-cause-higher-drop-off/ https://outmatch.com/long-assessment-cause-higher-drop-off/#comments_reply Wed, 18 May 2016 20:09:19 +0000 https://outmatch.com/?p=13105 Clients often ask how the length of an assessment will impact their candidate experience and drop-off rates. The screening process can be daunting, and many companies worry that an assessment will be a barrier to their candidate funnel. Also, companies want…

The post Will a Long Assessment Cause Higher Drop Off? appeared first on OutMatch.

]]>
Clients often ask how the length of an assessment will impact their candidate experience and drop-off rates. The screening process can be daunting, and many companies worry that an assessment will be a barrier to their candidate funnel.

Also, companies want to be sure they’re providing a positive experience because candidates are often customers.

It’s a reasonable concern, and just like anything, the trade-offs should be considered. Any kind of pre-hire insight, whether it comes from a screening call or an assessment or an interview, is an advantage for the employer, but it requires effort from the candidate. So the question is, how much effort are most candidates willing to put in?

Let’s look at sample of hourly candidates across industries:

Assessment Length Number of Questions Average Completion
Short (under 10 minutes) 40-100 94%
Average (about 10-15 minutes) 101-120 93%
Long (about 15-20 minutes) 121-140 94%
Very Long (20 minutes or more) 141-200 91%

As you can see, assessment length has just a slight impact on the average completion rate, which falls by only 3 percentage points when the assessment exceeds 140 questions.

The value of an assessment comes from its ability to measure work-related traits and predict how successful someone will be on the job. Too few questions, and the assessment becomes less reliable, meaning it may not be measuring what it’s supposed to be measuring.

And keep in mind—some drop off is a good thing. If a candidate realizes part-way through the screening process that he or she isn’t the right fit, either for the position or for your company, then you’ll be able to concentrate on other, more serious candidates.

If you’re still concerned about drop-off rates, here are a few other things to consider:

  • The candidate experience from beginning to end. What’s the very first interaction candidates have with your hiring process? Social media? Your career page? If the experience doesn’t start well, you’ll likely lose candidates before they even begin.
  • The length of your entire application process. Assessments are just one step in the process. It’s good to know what your average drop-off rate is, but look closer at each step and you’ll be able to pinpoint where the highest drop off is happening.
  • Where the assessment falls within your process. Is the assessment part of the online application, or does it come after the initial screening call? Either way, make sure you communicate the purpose and the time requirement before candidates begin.
  • Mobile support. 86% of candidates use their smartphone to begin a job search, and 70% want to be able to apply using their phone, according to talent expert Tim Sackett. If your goal is to cast a wide net for candidates, make sure you’re meeting their needs.

This post is part of our FAQs series, where you can learn about the inner-workings of our assessments, as well as best practices to help improve your hiring process.

The post Will a Long Assessment Cause Higher Drop Off? appeared first on OutMatch.

]]>
https://outmatch.com/long-assessment-cause-higher-drop-off/feed/ 0
What Are the Different Types of Assessments? https://outmatch.com/different-types-assessments/ https://outmatch.com/different-types-assessments/#comments_reply Wed, 11 May 2016 13:20:47 +0000 https://outmatch.com/?p=12931 According to the Aberdeen Group, more than 2/3 of top companies use pre-hire assessments. But not all assessments have the same purpose. Do you know the differences between them? Here are three types of assessments that you can use to narrow down candidates…

The post What Are the Different Types of Assessments? appeared first on OutMatch.

]]>
According to the Aberdeen Group, more than 2/3 of top companies use pre-hire assessments. But not all assessments have the same purpose. Do you know the differences between them?

Here are three types of assessments that you can use to narrow down candidates to the very best fit:

  1. Skills Assessment. Because certain jobs require certain skills, these assessments test for technical or professional expertise. You wouldn’t hire a plumber or an electrician if they didn’t have the skills to do the job. For jobs in the corporate world, you can test a candidate’s proficiency in software like AutoCAD or Photoshop, for example, or assess their general understanding of financial or business concepts.
  2. Cognitive Assessment. Sometimes called aptitude tests, these assessments measure a candidate’s verbal, critical thinking, or abstract reasoning skills. On a cognitive assessment, you might find logic or reading comprehension questions, or non-verbal items like patterns to test a candidate’s mental abilities.
  3. Personality Assessment. These assessments measure the innate traits and tendencies that influence behavior at work. Depending on the job type, you might measure things like sociability, work pace, persuasiveness, detail orientation, etc. Where other types of assessments tell you if a candidate is capable of doing the job, personality assessments also predict a candidate’s level of satisfaction and potential for success in a given work setting.

And the best part? You don’t have to choose just one! Now that you know what kind of insight you can gain from each type of assessment, take a look at your current process to see if there are any gaps. Depending on the job type and level within the organization, you can layer on assessments for the most complete picture of a candidate’s current skill set, job competencies, work potential.

This post is part of our FAQs series, where you can learn about the inner-workings of our assessments, as well as best practices to help improve your hiring process.

The post What Are the Different Types of Assessments? appeared first on OutMatch.

]]>
https://outmatch.com/different-types-assessments/feed/ 0
How Do I Read the Competency Graph in My Assess Report? https://outmatch.com/read-competency-graph-assess-report/ https://outmatch.com/read-competency-graph-assess-report/#comments_reply Tue, 03 May 2016 18:40:48 +0000 https://outmatch.com/?p=12741 Our assessments measure the personality traits and tendencies that predict success for important job competencies. When you look at a candidate’s assessment report, you’ll see a graph for each competency measured by the assessment. These graphs make it easy to see where candidates score…

The post How Do I Read the Competency Graph in My Assess Report? appeared first on OutMatch.

]]>
Our assessments measure the personality traits and tendencies that predict success for important job competencies.

When you look at a candidate’s assessment report, you’ll see a graph for each competency measured by the assessment. These graphs make it easy to see where candidates score on each of the core competencies in a success model.

Let’s look at the graph for Decisive Judgement, which is made up of five traits: Fact-Based, Realistic, Serious-Minded, Restrained, Self-Reliance, and Assertiveness. These are the traits that most influence Decisive Judgement. Other competencies have different traits.

Decisive Judgment competency graph

What are the blue dots?

The blue dots represent a candidate’s score, or where they fall on the spectrum for that trait. Scores in the boxes on the left mean the candidate is lower on that trait than others, and scores in the boxes on the right mean the candidate is higher than others. For example, this candidate is high on Assertiveness (but read on—high scores are not always best!)

What do the colors mean?

  • Green is ideal—for a good fit, look for dots that fall within the green range.
  • Yellow is potential concern—dig in to determine if these are red flags or opportunities for improvement.
  • Red is a likely concern—watch out for too many dots in the red range.

What’s the difference between an interview question and a “special probe”?

To the right of the graph, you’ll see a suggested interview question. This question is the same for all candidates and helps connect specific behavioral examples to the competency.

Below the graph, you’ll see “additional special probes.” These questions are unique to the candidate and help the interviewer gain a deeper understanding of the yellow and red areas.

Things to keep in mind as you review competencies:

  • There’s no perfect candidate. Most candidates will have strengths (scores in the green range) as well as opportunities for improvement (scores in the yellow or red range).
  • Successful candidates don’t need to be in the green range for all traits in a competency. There are many competencies to consider when determining job fit, so don’t get too hung up if a few traits fall out of range.
  • Use the suggested interview questions and probes to better understand areas of concern. Listen for examples of hindered job performance, and work to understand if the candidate has learned to compensate for their natural tendency.
  • Different jobs require different competencies. A candidate may score well on one set of competencies, or have traits that set them up for success in a certain type of job, but those same traits may be areas of concern when applied to a different role.

These competency range graphs are your first look at how well the candidate’s innate style fits with the job and with your organization. From here, you can continue to dig into the assessment report for an even deeper understanding of a candidate’s motivations, work preferences, and job potential.

This post is part of our FAQs series, where you can learn about the inner-workings of our assessments, as well as best practices to help improve your hiring process.

The post How Do I Read the Competency Graph in My Assess Report? appeared first on OutMatch.

]]>
https://outmatch.com/read-competency-graph-assess-report/feed/ 0
How Do I Know Candidates Aren’t Cheating or Trying to “Beat” the Assessment? https://outmatch.com/4-ways-to-prevent-faking-on-assessments/ https://outmatch.com/4-ways-to-prevent-faking-on-assessments/#comments_reply Fri, 05 Feb 2016 19:05:50 +0000 https://outmatch.com/?p=11858 SHRM reports that up to 53% of resumes contain untruths. If half of the people you screen are lying on their resume, what’s to keep them from cheating or lying on an assessment? Actually, it’s a lot harder to cheat than you might think. Here are…

The post How Do I Know Candidates Aren’t Cheating or Trying to “Beat” the Assessment? appeared first on OutMatch.

]]>
SHRM reports that up to 53% of resumes contain untruths. If half of the people you screen are lying on their resume, what’s to keep them from cheating or lying on an assessment?

Actually, it’s a lot harder to cheat than you might think. Here are four ways to get to the truth and minimize the likelihood of cheating:

  1. Encourage Candidate Accountability
    How you introduce the assessment makes a big difference. Before giving an assessment, make sure to communicate the purpose and explain why it benefits candidates to answer honestly, as opposed to  trying to guess the “right” answer. If they misrepresent their personal strengths, goals, and preferences, they could end up in a job they don’t like. Also let candidates know that assessments are just one step in the process, and their results won’t make or break the final hiring decision. To catch any untruths that do slip through, our assessment results come with an interview guide to help hiring managers verify candidates’ responses.
  1. Catch the “Too Good to be True” Candidate
    It’s natural for candidates to want to show their best self and sell the hiring manager on what a great addition they’ll be to the team. Usually candidates aren’t lying outright, but they may exaggerate the truth to make themselves look better. To flag this tendency, our assessments include statements like “I was my boss’s best employee at my old job” or “I never get stressed at work.” If a candidate agrees with all of these statements, it’s likely they’re inflating their answers to get positive assessment results. In these cases, the hiring manager will get a flagged report.
  1. Target Ideal Ranges, Not High Scores
    Every trait measured in the assessment has its pros and cons, and the ideal range for any given trait varies from role to role. In other words, a candidate won’t ace the assessment by getting all high scores. Take Sociability, for example. The role you’re filling might call for candidates who score in the mid-high range on Sociability. Someone in this range will find it easy to meet new people, communicate goals and activities, and work comfortably with others. Someone who scores too high on Sociability may distract the team by being overly talkative or unfocused.
  1. Take Advantage of Phrasing
    Some questions on an assessment may seem like they’re strangely worded, but phrasing matters. Many people, for example, think Detail Orientation is an important quality for any job, so they may try to score high in this area on purpose. A question that says “I am detailed in my work” won’t differentiate between people who are and people who want to be. Our questions are more specific: “I focus so much on the details in my work that I often have trouble completing projects on time.” Agreeing or disagreeing with this statement gives the hiring manger much more insight about how the candidate approaches their work.

People will always emphasize their best qualities on a resume and in an interview, but you don’t have to worry about lying if you’re using the right assessment. In fact, an assessment that’s validated and reliable is the best way to cut through the clutter and get an honest, un-obscured picture of a candidate’s natural work style.

This post is part of our FAQs series, where you can learn about the inner-workings of our assessments, as well as best practices to help improve your hiring process.

The post How Do I Know Candidates Aren’t Cheating or Trying to “Beat” the Assessment? appeared first on OutMatch.

]]>
https://outmatch.com/4-ways-to-prevent-faking-on-assessments/feed/ 0
Validity vs. Reliability. Do You Know the Difference? https://outmatch.com/validity-vs-reliability-do-you-know-the-differences/ https://outmatch.com/validity-vs-reliability-do-you-know-the-differences/#comments_reply Thu, 02 Apr 2015 15:12:44 +0000 https://www.chequed.com/?p=10152 While validity and reliability go hand in hand when it comes to personality assessment or other forms of employment testing, they do differ. Validity basically refers to research that provides evidence that a test actually measures what it is supposed…

The post Validity vs. Reliability. Do You Know the Difference? appeared first on OutMatch.

]]>
validity vs. reliabilityWhile validity and reliability go hand in hand when it comes to personality assessment or other forms of employment testing, they do differ. Validity basically refers to research that provides evidence that a test actually measures what it is supposed to measure. Reliability is more of a consistency measure.

How reliable is it?

Consider this: You measured the length of your dining room table. It was 72 inches long. What if you measured it the next day and it was 68 inches? You would have to find out what went wrong with the measurement.  Did you use the tape measure incorrectly? Is your tape measure faulty? A reliable measure should yield the same result. If it did not we would say that the measure is unreliable.

So, similar to a pre-employment test, if, for example, if a person scores high in a trait such as dominance, that result should be the same if that same person takes the test six weeks later. If however, that same person scores low in dominance, you would have to conclude that the measure (or test) was inaccurate and unreliable and, therefore, of minimal value.

How valid is it?

Validity is the most important issue in selecting a test. It refers to what characteristic the test measures and how well the test measures that characteristic. It also tells you if the characteristic being measured by a test is related to job qualifications and requirements. Validity evidence indicates that there is linkage between test performance and job performance. It can tell you what you may conclude or predict about someone from his or her score on the test.

It is important to understand the differences between reliability and validity. Validity will tell you how good a test is for a particular situation; reliability will tell you how trustworthy a score on that test will be. You cannot draw valid conclusions from a test score unless you are sure that the test is reliable. Even when a test is reliable, it may not be valid. So, therefore you should be careful that any test you select is both reliable and valid for your situation.

When is a test both valid and reliable?

So while reliability and validity are closely inter-related, the distinct difference is best summed up with an example: A researcher devises a new test that measures IQ faster than the standard IQ test:

  • If the test delivers scores for a candidate of 82, 63, 141 and 100, then the test is not reliable or valid.
  • If the test consistently delivers a score of 99 when checked, but the candidates real IQ is 122, then the test is reliable, but not valid.
  • If the test delivers a consistent score of 118, then that is pretty close, and the test can be considered valid and reliable.

 

Learn more about OutMatch and how our assessments provide both validity and reliability today with a free demo!

The post Validity vs. Reliability. Do You Know the Difference? appeared first on OutMatch.

]]>
https://outmatch.com/validity-vs-reliability-do-you-know-the-differences/feed/ 0